color Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo
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Meaning of “color” in the English Dictionary

"color" in American English

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colornoun

(Cdn Br colour)  us   /ˈkʌl·ər/
  • color noun (APPEARANCE)

[C/U] the appearance that something has as a result of reflecting light: [C] The dress comes in blue, green, red, and other colors. [U] Some of the pictures in the book are in color, and some are in black and white.
art [C/U] A color is also a substance, such as a paint or dye, which you add to something to make it have the appearance of a particular color.
  • color noun (SKIN)

[U] the natural color of a person’s skin, esp. when considered in terms of race
people of color
Many people with dark skin describe themselves as people of color: We need to protect the rights of people of color.
[U] Color can mean a healthy appearance of the skin: She’d been ill for a while, but when I saw her last Friday, she had good color.

colorverb [I/T]

(Cdn Br colour)  us   /ˈkʌl·ər/
  • color verb [I/T] (CHANGE APPEARANCE)

to change the color of something by using paint or a dye: [I always + adv/prep] He gives the boy books to read, and he buys him paints to color with.
fig. If something or someone colors your thoughts or opinions, it influences them, often in a negative way: [T] The report is colored by the fiscal crises of the last four years.

coloradjective [not gradable]

(Cdn Br colour)  us   /ˈkʌl·ər/
showing things in all their colors, not just black and white: color photos a color TV
(Definition of color from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
Translations of “color”
in Chinese (Simplified) 颜色…
in Turkish renk…
in Russian см. colour…
in Chinese (Traditional) 顏色…
in Polish -…
What is the pronunciation of color?
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A bunch of stuff about plurals
A bunch of stuff about plurals
by ,
May 24, 2016
by Colin McIntosh One of the many ways in which English differs from other languages is its use of uncountable nouns to talk about collections of objects: as well as never being used in the plural, they’re never used with a or an. Examples are furniture (plural in German and many other languages), cutlery (plural in Italian), and

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