commercial Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Meaning of “commercial” in the English Dictionary

"commercial" in British English

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commercialadjective

uk   /kəˈmɜː.ʃəl/  us   /-ˈmɝː-/
B2 related to ​buying and ​selling things: a commercial ​organization/​venture/​success commercial ​law The commercial ​future of the ​companylooks very ​promising. disapproving used to ​describe a ​record, ​film, ​book, etc. that has been ​produced with the ​aim of making ​money and as a ​result has little ​artisticvalue [before noun] A commercial ​product can be ​bought by or is ​intended to be ​bought by the ​generalpublic.C2 [before noun] used to refer to ​radio or ​televisionpaid for by ​advertisements that are ​broadcast between and during ​programmes
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commercially
adverb uk   us   /-i/
Does the ​marketresearch show that the ​product will ​succeed commercially (= make a ​profit)? The ​drug won't be commercially available (= ​able to be ​bought) until it has been ​thoroughlytested.

commercialnoun [C]

uk   /kəˈmɜː.ʃəl/  us   /-ˈmɝː-/
B1 an ​advertisement that is ​broadcast on ​television or ​radio: a commercial ​break
(Definition of commercial from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"commercial" in American English

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commercialnoun [C]

 us   /kəˈmɜr·ʃəl/
a ​paidadvertisement on ​radio or ​television: We all ​ran to get something to ​eat during the commercials.

commercialadjective

 us   /kəˈmɜr·ʃəl/
intended to make ​money, or ​relating to a ​businessintended to make ​money: The ​movie was a commercial ​success (= it made ​money), but the ​criticshated it.
commercially
adverb  us   /kəˈmɜr·ʃə·li/
(Definition of commercial from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"commercial" in Business English

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commercialadjective

uk   us   /kəˈmɜːʃəl/ COMMERCE
relating to ​businesses and their ​activities: Planning ​issues continue to ​stall the company's ​proposed commercial ​development. commercial ​sales/​services/​transactions etc.
used to describe a ​product or ​service that can be ​bought by the ​public: The ​airporthandles 663 commercial ​flights a day.
[before noun] for making a ​profit or ​relating to making a ​profit: The ​business was never intended to be a commercial ​enterprise.commercial success/value Some traditional ​producers are ​finally enjoying commercial ​success.
[before noun] used to describe radio or ​television that is ​paid for by the ​advertisements it ​broadcasts: The ​commission, which ​licenses and ​regulates commercial TV, ​ordered the ad off ​air.
disapproving used to describe a ​product, especially a ​record, film, or ​book, which is made to make a ​profit rather than be of a high artistic ​quality: Their music is a little too commercial for me.

commercialnoun [C]

uk   us   /kəˈmɜːʃəl/
MARKETING an ​advertisement that is ​broadcast on ​television or radio: American ​manufacturers have ​produced a ​series of TV commercials ​highlightingmanufacturing successes.
commercials STOCK MARKET shares in a ​company that ​sellsgoods to ​consumers: Commercials ​ended the ​year down 3.5%.
(Definition of commercial from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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