communication Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo
Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

Meaning of “communication” in the English Dictionary

"communication" in British English

See all translations

communicationnoun

uk   /kəˌmjuː.nɪˈkeɪ.ʃən/  us   /kəˌmjuː.nəˈkeɪ.ʃən/
B1 [U] the ​act of ​communicating with ​people: Television is an ​increasinglyimportant means of communication. We are indirect communication with Moscow. With no ​decentphonesignal, communication is ​difficult. There's very little communication betweenmother and ​daughter (= they do not have a good ​relationship). a ​course on communication ​skills
[C] formal a ​message or a ​letter: We ​receivedyour communication of 11 ​March and are ​sorry to ​inform you that we won't be ​attending the ​conference.
communications [plural]
the ​variousmethods of ​sendinginformation between ​people and ​places, ​especiallyphones, ​computers, ​radio, etc.: the communications ​industry
ways of ​moving between one ​place and another: Its ​commercialsuccess as a ​city is ​partlydue to ​itsexcellentrail and ​road communications.

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

(Definition of communication from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"communication" in American English

See all translations

communicationnoun [C/U]

 us   /kəˌmju·nɪˈkeɪ·ʃən/
the ​process by which ​messages or ​information is ​sent from one ​place or ​person to another, or the ​message itself: [U] E-mail is an ​increasinglyimportantmeans of ​business communication.
Communication is also the ​exchange of ​information and the ​expression of ​feeling that can ​result in ​understanding: [U] There was very little communication between the two ​brothers.
(Definition of communication from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"communication" in Business English

See all translations

communicationnoun

uk   us   /kəˌmjuːnɪˈkeɪʃən/ COMMUNICATIONS
[U] the ​process of sharing ​information, especially when this ​increasesunderstanding between ​people or ​groups: We have been in communication with various ​agencies in ​regard to this matter.a form/means/method of communication Email is an excellent ​means of communication because of the ​flexibility it ​allows. The ​trainingdepartment uses a ​specialboardgame to ​improve communication betweenmanagers and their ​employees.enhance/improve/foster communication He said communication with ​neighborhoods and ​communitygroups must be ​improved. The ​projectfailed because of a lack of communication between the two ​departments. There was a breakdown in communication.channels/lines of communication It is important to ​keep the ​channels of communication ​open at all ​times. Effective communication is a ​two-wayprocess. Good communication ​skills are ​essential in this ​job. In the ​study, the ​effectiveness of online communication was contrasted with ​person-to-personinteraction.
[C] formal a written or spoken ​message: I ​kept a ​record of who I spoke to, ​wrote to, or received a communication from. By ​subscribing to the ​list, you are ​agreeing to receive ​regularemail communications from the ​company.
(Definition of communication from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of communication?
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website

“communication” in Business English

There, their and they’re – which one should you use?
There, their and they’re – which one should you use?
by ,
April 27, 2016
by Liz Walter If you are a learner of English and you are confused about the words there, their and they’re, let me reassure you: many, many people with English as their first language share your problem! You only have to take a look at the ‘comments’ sections on the website of, for example, a popular

Read More 

Word of the Day

nutty

containing, tasting of, or similar to nuts

Word of the Day

bio-banding noun
bio-banding noun
April 25, 2016
in sport, grouping children according to their physical maturity rather than their age ‘When we’re grouping children for sports, we do it by age groups, but the problem is that, within those age groups, we get huge variations in biological age,’ said Dr Sean Cumming, senior lecturer at the University of Bath’s department for

Read More