Meaning of “complete” in the English Dictionary

"complete" in British English

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completeverb [ T ]

uk /kəmˈpliːt/ us /kəmˈpliːt/

complete verb [ T ] (MAKE WHOLE)

A2 to make whole or perfect:

Complete the sentence with one of the adjectives provided.
He only needs two more cards to complete the set.
All she needed to complete her happiness was a baby.

A2 to write all the details asked for on a form or other document:

Have you completed your application form yet?

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complete verb [ T ] (FINISH)

A2 to finish doing something:

He's just completed filming his 17th feature film.
The palace took over 20 years to complete.
She will complete her studies in France.

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completeadjective

uk /kəmˈpliːt/ us /kəmˈpliːt/

complete adjective (VERY GREAT)

B1 [ before noun ] very great or to the largest degree possible:

The man's a complete fool!
I need a break, a complete change of scene.
I made a complete and utter mess of it!

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complete adjective (WHOLE)

B1 with all the parts:

the complete works of Oscar Wilde
The report comes complete with (= including) diagrams and colour photographs.
Sun, sand, and romance - her holiday was complete.

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(Definition of “complete” from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"complete" in American English

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completeadjective

us /kəmˈplit/

complete adjective (WHOLE)

containing all the parts or pieces; whole:

a complete set of dishes
the complete works of Dickens
We wanted a complete record of what everyone said.

complete adjective (VERY GREAT)

very great, without limit, or to the largest degree possible:

The trip began in complete confusion.
She gave me a look of complete indifference.
Toby and Alfredo are complete opposites.
completely
adverb us /kəmˈplit·li/

To be completely honest, I was too scared to say anything.

completeverb [ T ]

us /kəmˈplit/

complete verb [ T ] (FINISH)

to finish doing something:

John has completed 15 marathons.
She completed three years of college, and then took a year off.

complete verb [ T ] (MAKE WHOLE)

to supply all the parts or pieces needed to make something whole:

She needed one more course to complete the requirements for a teaching degree.
completion
noun [ U ] us /kəmˈpli·ʃən/

He was the architect who supervised the completion of the hotel.

(Definition of “complete” from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)