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Meaning of “complete” in the English Dictionary

"complete" in British English

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completeverb [T]

uk   /kəmˈpliːt/  us   /kəmˈpliːt/
  • complete verb [T] (MAKE WHOLE)

A2 to make ​whole or ​perfect: Complete the ​sentence with one of the ​adjectivesprovided. He only ​needs two more ​cards to complete the set. All she ​needed to complete her ​happiness was a ​baby.
A2 to write all the ​detailsasked for on a ​form or other ​document: Have you completed ​yourapplicationformyet?

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  • complete verb [T] (FINISH)

A2 to ​finish doing something: He's just completed ​filming his 17th ​featurefilm. The ​palace took over 20 ​years to complete. She will complete her ​studies in France.

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

completeadjective

uk   /kəmˈpliːt/  us   /kəmˈpliːt/
  • complete adjective (VERY GREAT)

B1 [before noun] very ​great or to the ​largestdegreepossible: The man's a complete ​fool! I need a ​break, a complete ​change of ​scene. I made a complete and ​uttermess of it!

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

  • complete adjective (WHOLE)

B1 with all the ​parts: the complete ​works of ​Oscar Wilde The ​report comes complete with (= ​including)diagrams and ​colourphotographs. Sun, ​sand, and ​romance - her ​holiday was complete.

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

(Definition of complete from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"complete" in American English

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completeadjective

 us   /kəmˈplit/
  • complete adjective (WHOLE)

containing all the ​parts or ​pieces; ​whole: a complete set of ​dishes the complete ​works of Dickens We ​wanted a complete ​record of what everyone said.
  • complete adjective (VERY GREAT)

very ​great, without ​limit, or to the ​largestdegreepossible: The ​tripbegan in complete ​confusion. She gave me a ​look of complete ​indifference. Toby and Alfredo are complete opposites.
completely
adverb  us   /kəmˈplit·li/
To be completely ​honest, I was too ​scared to say anything.

completeverb [T]

 us   /kəmˈplit/
  • complete verb [T] (FINISH)

to ​finish doing something: John has completed 15 ​marathons. She completed three ​years of ​college, and then took a ​year off.
  • complete verb [T] (MAKE WHOLE)

to ​supply all the ​parts or ​piecesneeded to make something ​whole: She ​needed one more ​course to complete the ​requirements for a ​teachingdegree.
completion
noun [U]  us   /kəmˈpli·ʃən/
He was the ​architect who ​supervised the completion of the ​hotel.
(Definition of complete from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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