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Meaning of “concurrent” in the English Dictionary

"concurrent" in British English

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concurrentadjective

uk   /kənˈkʌr.ənt/ us   /kənˈkɝː.ənt/
(Definition of concurrent from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"concurrent" in American English

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concurrentadjective

us   /kənˈkɜr·ənt, -ˈkʌr·ənt/
happening at the same time: He’s serving two concurrent 10-year sentences.
physics A concurrent force is one of two or more forces that are in effect at the same time.
concurrently
adverb us   /kənˈkɜr·ənt·li, -ˈkʌr·ənt-/
He dealt with several issues concurrently.
(Definition of concurrent from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"concurrent" in Business English

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concurrentadjective

uk   /kənˈkʌrənt/ us  
happening or existing at the same time as something else: Delivery of the goods and payment of the price are concurrent conditions, and must therefore occur at the same time.concurrent with sth Competitions for consumer goods are usually promoted on the pack concurrent with in-store promotion.
IT relating to a computer system that can be used by several people at the same time: The best online systems can handle thousands of concurrent users. Concurrent licences allow more than one person at a company to share a single piece of software over a computer network.
concurrently
adverb /kənˈkʌrəntli/ /-ˈkɝː-/
The French regulator, the CMF, said yesterday that all the bids should run concurrently.
(Definition of concurrent from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of concurrent?
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“concurrent” in British English

“concurrent” in American English

“concurrent” in Business English

Avoiding common errors with the word enough.
Avoiding common errors with the word enough.
by ,
May 25, 2016
by Liz Walter Enough is a very common word, but it is easy to make mistakes with it. You need to be careful about its position in a sentence, and the prepositions or verb patterns that come after it. I’ll start with the position of enough in the sentence. When we use it with a noun,

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