confirm Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Meaning of “confirm” in the English Dictionary

"confirm" in British English

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confirmverb

uk   /kənˈfɜːm/  us   /-ˈfɝːm/

confirm verb (MAKE CERTAIN)

B1 [I or T] to make an ​arrangement or ​meetingcertain, often by ​phone or writing: [+ that] Six ​people have confirmed that they will be ​attending and ten haven't ​repliedyet. Flights should be confirmed 48 ​hours before ​departure. I've ​accepted the ​job over the ​phone, but I haven't confirmed in writing ​yet.
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confirm verb (PROVE TRUE)

B2 [T] to ​prove that a ​belief or an ​opinion that was ​previously not ​completelycertain is ​true: [+ question word] The ​smell of ​cigarettesmoke confirmed what he had ​suspected: there had been a ​party in his ​absence. [+ (that)] Her ​announcement confirmed (that) she would be ​resigning as ​CEO. The ​young man's ​kindness confirmed her ​faith in ​youngpeople.
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confirm verb (RELIGION)

[T] to ​accept someone ​formally as a ​fullmember of the ​Christian Church at a ​specialceremony
(Definition of confirm from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"confirm" in American English

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confirmverb [T]

 us   /kənˈfɜrm/

confirm verb [T] (MAKE PLANS)

to make an ​arrangement, ​plan, or ​meetingcertain or ​fixed: The ​hotel has confirmed ​ourreservation. [+ that clause] Seventy ​people have confirmed that they will ​attend the ​conference.

confirm verb [T] (APPROVE)

to ​approve someone or something ​officially by ​formalagreement: His ​appointment has not been confirmed by the Senate.

confirm verb [T] (PROVE TRUE)

to ​prove or ​state the ​truth of something that was ​previously not ​completelycertain: [+ that clause] Health ​officials confirmed that there’s a ​fluepidemicunderway.

confirm verb [T] (RELIGION)

in some ​Christianreligions, to ​formallyaccept someone as a ​member
(Definition of confirm from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"confirm" in Business English

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confirmverb

uk   us   /kənˈfɜːm/
[I or T] to make an ​arrangement or ​meetingcertain, often by ​phone or writing: confirm that So far ten ​people have confirmed that they will be ​attending the ​meeting. When ​initialappointments are made over the ​telephone, these should also be confirmed in writing. No ​contract exists until the ​company confirms by ​email that their ​order has been ​dispatched. The ​group said it expected another $5 ​billion of ​orders to be confirmed soon.
[T] to prove or say that something is ​true: Britain's biggest dairy ​company yesterday confirmed 3,450 ​joblosses. They ​refused to confirm or denyspeculation that the ​company was to ​close.
confirmation
noun [C or U]
It is ​essential to obtain confirmation in writing.confirmation that Investors are looking for confirmation that the ​economy is ​picking up ​speed.
(Definition of confirm from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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