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Meaning of “confirm” in the English Dictionary

"confirm" in British English

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confirmverb

uk   /kənˈfɜːm/ us   /kənˈfɝːm/
  • confirm verb (MAKE CERTAIN)

B1 [I or T] to make an arrangement or meeting certain, often by phone or writing: [+ that] Six people have confirmed that they will be attending and ten haven't replied yet. Flights should be confirmed 48 hours before departure. I've accepted the job over the phone, but I haven't confirmed in writing yet.

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  • confirm verb (PROVE TRUE)

B2 [T] to prove that a belief or an opinion that was previously not completely certain is true: [+ question word] The smell of cigarette smoke confirmed what he had suspected: there had been a party in his absence. [+ (that)] Her announcement confirmed (that) she would be resigning as CEO. The young man's kindness confirmed her faith in young people.

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  • confirm verb (RELIGION)

[T] to accept someone formally as a full member of the Christian Church at a special ceremony
(Definition of confirm from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"confirm" in American English

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confirmverb [T]

us   /kənˈfɜrm/
  • confirm verb [T] (MAKE PLANS)

to make an arrangement, plan, or meeting certain or fixed: The hotel has confirmed our reservation. [+ that clause] Seventy people have confirmed that they will attend the conference.
  • confirm verb [T] (APPROVE)

to approve someone or something officially by formal agreement: His appointment has not been confirmed by the Senate.
  • confirm verb [T] (PROVE TRUE)

to prove or state the truth of something that was previously not completely certain: [+ that clause] Health officials confirmed that there’s a flu epidemic underway.
  • confirm verb [T] (RELIGION)

in some Christian religions, to formally accept someone as a member
(Definition of confirm from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"confirm" in Business English

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confirmverb

uk   /kənˈfɜːm/ us  
[I or T] to make an arrangement or meeting certain, often by phone or writing: confirm that So far ten people have confirmed that they will be attending the meeting. When initial appointments are made over the telephone, these should also be confirmed in writing. No contract exists until the company confirms by email that their order has been dispatched. The group said it expected another $5 billion of orders to be confirmed soon.
[T] to prove or say that something is true: Britain's biggest dairy company yesterday confirmed 3,450 job losses. They refused to confirm or deny speculation that the company was to close.
confirmation
noun [C or U]
It is essential to obtain confirmation in writing.confirmation that Investors are looking for confirmation that the economy is picking up speed.
(Definition of confirm from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“confirm” in Business English

Watching the detectorists
Watching the detectorists
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May 31, 2016
by Colin McIntosh You could be forgiven for thinking that old-fashioned hobbies that don’t involve computers have fallen out of favour. In fact, nothing could be further from the truth. If anything, the internet has made it easier for people with specialist hobbies from different corners of the world to come together to support one another

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