Meaning of “connotation” in the English Dictionary

"connotation" in British English

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connotationnoun [ C ]

uk /ˌkɒn.əˈteɪ.ʃən/ us /ˌkɑː.nəˈteɪ.ʃən/

a feeling or idea that is suggested by a particular word although it need not be a part of the word's meaning, or something suggested by an object or situation:

The word "lady" has connotations of refinement and excessive femininity that some women find offensive.
connote
verb [ T ] uk /kəˈnəʊt/ us /kəˈnoʊt/ formal

To me, chocolate connotes pleasure and indulgence.

(Definition of “connotation” from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"connotation" in American English

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connotationnoun [ C ]

us /ˌkɑn·əˈteɪ·ʃən/

grammar a feeling or idea that is suggested by a word in addition to its basic meaning, or something suggested by an object or situation:

"Resolute" means stubborn, but with a more positive connotation.

(Definition of “connotation” from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)