Meaning of “conscious” in the English Dictionary

"conscious" in English

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consciousadjective

uk /ˈkɒn.ʃəs/ us /ˈkɑːn.ʃəs/

conscious adjective (NOTICING)

be conscious of sth/sb

More examples

B2 to notice that a particular thing or person exists or is present:

My tooth doesn't exactly hurt, but I'm conscious of it (= I can feel it) all the time.
[ + -ing verb ] I think she's very conscious of being the only person in the office who didn't have a university education.
[ + that ] He gradually became conscious (of the fact) that everyone else was wearing a suit.
See also

conscious adjective (AWAKE)

C1 awake, thinking, and knowing what is happening around you:

He's still conscious but he's very badly injured.
She's out of the operating theatre, but she's not fully conscious yet.
figurative humorous "Can I speak to Isobel, please?" "She's still in bed. I'll go and see if she's conscious (= awake) yet."
Opposite
consciously
adverb uk /ˈkɒn.ʃəs.li/ us /ˈkɑːn.ʃəs.li/

I don't think she's consciously rude to people - it's just the way she is.

-conscioussuffix

uk / -kɒn.ʃəs/ us / -kɑːn-/

(Definition of “conscious” from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"conscious" in American English

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consciousadjective

us /ˈkɑn·ʃəs/

conscious adjective (AWAKE)

awake, aware of what is happening around you, and able to think:

She’s out of surgery but not fully conscious yet.

conscious adjective (NOTICING)

noticing the existence of something:

People have become much more conscious of the need to exercise regularly.

conscious adjective (INTENTIONAL)

determined and intentional:

Was it a conscious decision to break up the group, or did it just happen?

conscious adjective (AWARE)

being especially aware of or worried about something:

Consumers aren’t as conscious of prices as they were last year.
consciously
adverb us /ˈkɑn·ʃəs·li/

I’ve never done anything consciously to offend anyone.

(Definition of “conscious” from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

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conscious

The crucial point is that they take a conscious decision to pass on their data and that they can determine how the said data may be used.
A conscious choice was made in favour of gradual and partial abolition, to prevent an abrupt departure from carefully constructed export positions.
In addition to general economic interests, what is at stake here are the values of a democratic society in which the conscious participation of properly informed citizens is required.
While conscious of the need to respect trade secrets, naturally - we sometimes address areas that could be sensitive - we would like to request further information.
Nevertheless, there is still much to do and we are very conscious of the need to press on with reforming the management of our programmes.
We are also conscious of the fact that the sum which is not now being paid out will, in principle, have to be paid out at a later stage.
In my opinion, this is a fundamental issue which we must be very conscious of and, above all, we must act accordingly and as quickly as possible.
We need a conscious attempt at coherence.
I am conscious of the need for continuity in the research area, both in terms of the integrity of the work being undertaken and the engagement of personnel on projects.
There is often a conscious or subconscious concern not to be too explicit, not to be too hard, not to irritate people even if they are wrong.