Meaning of “contradict” in the English Dictionary

"contradict" in British English

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contradictverb [ I or T ]

uk /ˌkɒn.trəˈdɪkt/ us /ˌkɑːn.trəˈdɪkt/

C1 (of people) to say the opposite of what someone else has said, or (of one fact or statement) to be so different from another fact or statement that one of them must be wrong:

If you're both going to lie, at least stick to the same story and don't contradict each other!
He kept contradicting himself when we were arguing - I think he was a bit confused.
How dare you contradict (me)!
Recent evidence has contradicted established theories on this subject.

(Definition of “contradict” from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"contradict" in American English

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contradictverb [ T ]

us /ˌkɑn·trəˈdɪkt/

(of people) to state the opposite of what someone has said, or (of one fact or statement) to be so different from another fact or statement that one of them must be wrong:

Her testimony contradicted the policeman’s testimony, and the jury had to decide who was telling the truth.
contradictory
adjective us /ˌkɑn·trəˈdɪk·tə·ri/

We received contradictory accounts about the success of the military campaign.

(Definition of “contradict” from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)