contrast Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo

Meaning of “contrast” in the English Dictionary

"contrast" in British English

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contrastnoun [C or U]

uk   /ˈkɒn.trɑːst/  us   /ˈkɑːn.træst/
B2 an ​obviousdifference between two or more things: I like the contrast of the ​whitetrousers with the ​blackjacket. The ​antiquefurnishingprovides an ​unusual contrast to the ​modernity of the ​building. There's a marked contrast between his ​character and hers. Their ​economy has ​expanded, while ours, by/in contrast, has ​declined. The ​amountspent on ​defence is in ​stark/​sharp (= in very ​noticeable) contrast to that ​spent on ​housing and ​health. I ​love his use of contrast (= ​strongdifferences between ​light and ​darkness) in his ​laterphotographs.

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contrastverb

uk   /kənˈtrɑːst/  us   /-ˈtræst/
C2 [T] to ​compare two ​people or things in ​order to show the ​differences between them: If you contrast some of her early writing with her ​laterwork, you can ​see just how much she ​improved.C2 [I] If one thing contrasts with another, it is very different from it: The ​styles of the two ​filmmakers contrast ​quitedramatically. The ​tartness of the ​lemons contrasts with the ​sweetness of the ​honey.

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(Definition of contrast from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"contrast" in American English

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contrastnoun [C/U]

 us   /ˈkɑn·træst/
an ​easilynoticed or ​understooddifference between two or more things: [U] She is ​quitepetite, in contrast with her ​tallsister. [C] Contrasts between Manhattan’s ​rich and ​poorastonished him. art In ​art and ​photographs, contrast is the ​difference between ​dark and ​lightcolors or ​dark and ​lightareas.

contrastverb [I/T]

 us   /kənˈtræst/
to ​compare someone or something with another or ​others, or to show the ​differences between two or more things: [T] She contrasted Hamilton’s Federalist ​ideas with the Anti-Federalist ​views of Thomas Jefferson. [I] His ​aggressivestyle contrasts ​sharply with that of his ​low-keypredecessor.
(Definition of contrast from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“contrast” in British English

“contrast” in American English

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