correct Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo
Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

Meaning of “correct” in the English Dictionary

"correct" in British English

See all translations

correctadjective

uk   /kəˈrekt/  us   /kəˈrekt/
A2 in ​agreement with the ​truefacts or with what is ​generallyaccepted: a correct ​answer "Is that the correct ​spelling?" "I don't ​know - ​look it up in a ​dictionary." It's not correct todescribe them as "​students".formal "Your ​name is Angela ​Black?" "That is correct."
Synonym
Opposite
B1 taking or ​showinggreatcare to ​behave or ​speak in a way that is ​generallyaccepted and ​approved of: He's very correct in his ​dress/​speech/​manner, isn't he?

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

correctly
adverb uk   /kəˈrekt.li/  us   /kəˈrekt.li/
B1 Have I ​pronouncedyourname correctly?
correctness
noun [U] uk   /kəˈrekt.nəs/  us   /kəˈrekt.nəs/
He ​speaks with such correctness (= ​care) that it sometimes ​sounds very ​formal.

correctverb [T]

uk   /kəˈrekt/  us   /kəˈrekt/
B2 to show or ​tell someone that something is ​wrong and to make it ​right: Students said it was ​helpful if the ​teacher corrected ​theirpronunciation. I have 30 ​homeworkassignments to correct.
If a ​medicaltreatment corrects a ​particularcondition, it ​cures the ​condition or makes it ​easier to ​manage: glasses to correct ​poorvision a ​chair that corrects ​badposture
correct me if I'm wrong but...
said as a ​polite and ​slightlyformal way of ​disagreeing with someone: Correct me if I'm ​wrong, but I ​think we ​arranged the ​meeting for the 12 ​December.
(Definition of correct from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"correct" in American English

See all translations

correctadjective

 us   /kəˈrekt/
in ​agreement with the ​truefacts or with a ​generallyacceptedstandard: It’s ​yourresponsibility to ​see that ​yourtaxreturn is correct. Do you have the correct ​time? "Did you ​testify that you ​recognized this man?" "That’s correct."
correctly
adverb  us   /kəˈrekt·li/
Have I ​pronouncedyourname correctly?
correctness
noun [U]  us   /kəˈrekt·nəs/

correctverb [T]

 us   /kəˈrekt/
to show or ​fix what is ​wrong; make ​right: He ​knew she was ​mistaken but made no ​effort to correct her. It is the ​policy of this ​newspaper to correct ​errors of ​fact that ​appear in ​itsnewscolumns. Doctors can now use ​lasersurgery to correct ​certaineyeproblems.
(Definition of correct from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"correct" in Business English

See all translations

correctverb

uk   us   /kəˈrekt/
[I or T] if ​prices, ​values, etc. correct or correct themselves, they ​change and become more ​normal after a ​period of being too high, too ​low, etc.: The ​market is ​positioned to correct and that is what's ​happening. Experts believe this is merely a ​slowdown in the ​economy that will correct itself.
[T] to ​change an ​amount, a ​calculation, etc. in ​order to make it more ​accurate, by considering ​certain facts: These ​figures have been corrected to ​allow for ​inflationcorrect sth for sth The mid-year ​review did not correct the ​accounts for exchange-rate ​fluctuation.
(Definition of correct from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of correct?
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website

“correct” in British English

“correct” in American English

“correct” in Business English

There, their and they’re – which one should you use?
There, their and they’re – which one should you use?
by ,
April 27, 2016
by Liz Walter If you are a learner of English and you are confused about the words there, their and they’re, let me reassure you: many, many people with English as their first language share your problem! You only have to take a look at the ‘comments’ sections on the website of, for example, a popular

Read More 

Word of the Day

sample

a small amount of something that shows you what the rest is or should be like

Word of the Day

bio-banding noun
bio-banding noun
April 25, 2016
in sport, grouping children according to their physical maturity rather than their age ‘When we’re grouping children for sports, we do it by age groups, but the problem is that, within those age groups, we get huge variations in biological age,’ said Dr Sean Cumming, senior lecturer at the University of Bath’s department for

Read More