courage Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo

Meaning of “courage” in the English Dictionary

"courage" in British English

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couragenoun [U]

uk   /ˈkʌr.ɪdʒ/  us   /ˈkɝː-/
B2 the ​ability to ​controlyourfear in a ​dangerous or ​difficultsituation: They ​showedgreat courage when they ​found out about ​their baby's ​disability. [+ to infinitive] People should have the courage tostand up for ​theirbeliefs. It took me ​months to summon/​pluck up the courage toask for a ​promotion.
Synonym
have the courage of your convictions to be ​brave and ​confident enough to do what you ​believe in: Although many of his ​policies were ​unpopular, he had the courage of his ​convictions to ​see them through.

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(Definition of courage from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"courage" in American English

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couragenoun [U]

 us   /ˈkɜr·ɪdʒ, ˈkʌr·ɪdʒ/
the ​ability to ​controlfear and to be ​willing to ​deal with something that is ​dangerous, ​difficult, or ​unpleasant: He ​lacked the courage to ​tax the American ​people to ​pay for his ​Great Society ​programs. It took me several ​months to get up the courage to ​ask her to ​lunch.
courageous
adjective  us   /kəˈreɪ·dʒəs/
She ​showed herself to be a courageous ​journalist.
(Definition of courage from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
Translations of “courage”
in Korean 용기…
in Arabic شَجاعة…
in Malaysian keberanian…
in French courage…
in Russian храбрость…
in Chinese (Traditional) 勇氣,膽量, 勇敢…
in Italian coraggio…
in Turkish cesaret, yüreklilik, korkusuzluk…
in Polish odwaga…
in Spanish valor, valentía, coraje…
in Vietnamese dũng cảm…
in Portuguese coragem…
in Thai ความกล้าหาญ…
in German der Mut…
in Catalan valor, coratge…
in Japanese 勇気…
in Chinese (Simplified) 勇气,胆量, 勇敢…
in Indonesian keberanian…
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“courage” in American English

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