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Meaning of “crime” in the English Dictionary

"crime" in British English

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crimenoun

uk   /kraɪm/ us   /kraɪm/
B1 [U] illegal activities: a life of crime rising crime crime prevention petty (= unimportant) crime/serious crime
B1 [C] an illegal act: He has admitted committing several crimes, including fraud. The defendant is accused of/charged with a range of crimes, from theft to murder. A knife was found at the scene of the crime (= the place where the crime happened). Bombing civilians is a crime against humanity (= a cruel crime against many people).
[S] an unacceptable or very silly act or situation: To have hundreds of homeless people sleeping in the streets of a rich city like London is a crime . It would be a crime (= a waste) to spend such a beautiful day indoors.

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(Definition of crime from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"crime" in American English

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crimenoun [C/U]

us   /krɑɪm/
an action or activity that is against the law, or illegal activity generally: [U] Violent crime has been reduced. [C] It’s a crime to yell "fire" in a crowded theater if there isn’t one. [C] If you commit a crime, you will be punished.
People say something is a crime if it is wrong: [C usually sing] It’s a crime that people go to bed hungry in this country.
(Definition of crime from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"crime" in Business English

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crimenoun

uk   /kraɪm/ us   LAW
[U] illegal activities: The area was plagued with failing schools, rising crime and poor healthcare. Unemployment is associated with a rising crime rate. crime prevention petty/serious crime The judicial system has been too soft on corruption and white-collar crime. The number of cases of computer crime has continued to increase. The new database will help in the fight against identity fraud and organized crime.combat/tackle crime Most local stores were involved in the initiative to tackle retail crime.
[C] an illegal act: commit a crime The former chief executive had committed a crime and was brought to justice.be accused of/charged with/convicted of a crime The defendant is accused of a range of crimes, from fraud to embezzlement of company funds.
(Definition of crime from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“crime” in Business English

Avoiding common errors with the word enough.
Avoiding common errors with the word enough.
by ,
May 25, 2016
by Liz Walter Enough is a very common word, but it is easy to make mistakes with it. You need to be careful about its position in a sentence, and the prepositions or verb patterns that come after it. I’ll start with the position of enough in the sentence. When we use it with a noun,

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