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Meaning of “cross” in the English Dictionary

"cross" in British English

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crossverb

uk   /krɒs/  us   /krɑːs/
  • cross verb (GO ACROSS)

A2 [I or T] to go ​across from one ​side of something to the other: It's not a good ​place to cross the ​road. Look both ​ways before you cross over (= cross the ​road). Cross the ​bridge and ​turnright. They crossed from Albania into Greece.
cross sb's mind
B2 If something crosses ​yourmind, you ​think of it: It crossed my ​mindyesterday that you must be ​short of ​staff. It never ​once crossed my ​mind that she might be ​unhappy.

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cross your arms/fingers/legs
to put one of ​yourarms, ​fingers, or ​legs over the ​top of the other: She ​sat down and crossed her ​legs.
  • cross verb (MIX)

[T] If you cross a ​plant or ​animal with another of a different ​type, you ​cause them to ​breed together in ​order to ​produce a new variety (= ​type of ​plant or ​animal).
  • cross verb (MAKE SIGN)

UK specialized finance & economics to ​draw two ​linesacross the ​middle of a cheque to show that it ​needs to be ​paid into a ​bankaccount: a crossed ​cheque
cross yourself specialized
When Catholics and some other ​types of Christians cross themselves, they ​movetheirhand down and then ​acrosstheirface or ​chest, making the ​shape of a cross.

crossnoun [C]

uk   /krɒs/  us   /krɑːs/
  • cross noun [C] (MARK)

A1 UK a written ​mark (x or +) ​formed by two ​lines going ​across each other. The ​mark x is usually used to show where something is, or that something has not been written ​correctly.

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  • cross noun [C] (OBJECT)

B1 an ​object made of one ​longuprightpiece of ​wood, with a ​smallerpieceacross it near the ​top. In the past, ​people were ​tied or ​fastened with ​nails to crosses as a ​punishment and ​lefthanging on them until they ​died.
B1 an ​object in the ​shape of a cross that ​people were ​killed on, used as a ​symbol of ​Christianity: Christdied on the Cross. She ​wears a ​gold cross around her ​neck. The ​priest made the ​sign of the cross (= ​moved his or her ​hand down and then ​across the ​chest) over the ​deadbodies.
a medal in the ​shape of a cross: In ​Britain, the Victoria Cross is ​awarded for ​acts of ​greatbravery during ​wartime.

crossadjective

uk   /krɒs/  us   /krɑːs/

cross-prefix

uk   /krɒs-/  us   /krɑːs-/
(Definition of cross from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"cross" in Business English

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crossverb [T]

uk   us   /krɒs/
UK BANKING if you cross a cheque, you ​draw two ​lines across the middle of it to show that it must be ​paid into a ​bankaccount: a crossed ​cheque
(Definition of cross from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of cross?
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