crown Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary
Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

Meaning of “crown” in the English Dictionary

"crown" in British English

See all translations

crownnoun [C]

uk   us   /kraʊn/

crown noun [C] (HEAD COVERING)

a ​circulardecoration for the ​head, usually made of ​gold and jewels (= ​preciousstones), and ​worn by a ​king or ​queen at ​officialceremonies the ​act of ​winning a ​sportscompetition: He ​plans to ​defend his ​Olympic crown.
More examples

crown noun [C] (TOP PART)

the ​toppart of a ​head, ​hat, or ​hill: A ​pinkribbon had been ​tied around the crown of the ​hat.

crown noun [C] (TOOTH)

an ​artificialpiece used to ​cover a ​damagedtooth

crown noun [C] (COIN)

a British ​coin that is no ​longer used

crownverb [T]

uk   us   /kraʊn/

crown verb [T] (HEAD COVERING)

to put a crown on someone's ​head in an ​officialceremony that makes that ​personking or ​queen: Queen Elizabeth II was crowned (queen) (= made ​queen in a ​specialceremony) in 1953.
See also
If an ​event or ​achievement crowns something, it is the ​best or most ​successfulpart of it: an ​actingcareer crowned by her ​final Oscar-winning ​performance

crown verb [T] (TOP PART)

formal If something crowns something ​else, it is on or around the ​top of it: The ​church was crowned with ​goldendomes. slang to ​hit someone on the ​head

crown verb [T] (TOOTH)

to ​fit a crown (= ​toothcovering): She's had her two ​frontteeth crowned.
(Definition of crown from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"crown" in American English

See all translations

crownnoun [C]

 us   /krɑʊn/

crown noun [C] (HEAD COVERING)

a ​circulardecoration for the ​head, usually made of ​gold and ​jewels, ​worn by a ​king or ​queen at ​officialceremonies In a ​sportscompetition, a crown is a ​prize or ​position which you get for ​beating all the other competitors: They ​won six NBA crowns in seven ​years.

crown noun [C] (TOP PART)

the ​toppart of something, esp. a person’s ​head: Her ​hairstuckstraight up from her crown. The crown of a ​hat is the ​part that ​covers the ​top of ​yourhead.

crown noun [C] (TOOTH)

an ​artificialpiece used to ​cover the ​top and ​sides of a ​tooth, esp. if it is ​damaged: a ​gold crown

crownverb [T]

 us   /krɑʊn/

crown verb [T] (BE BEST)

to be the ​best or most ​successfulpart of an ​activity or ​life: He hoped that health-care was the ​achievement that would crown his ​administration.

crown verb [T] (COVER HEAD AS SYMBOL)

to make someone ​officially a ​king or ​queen of a ​country: Queen Elizabeth II was crowned in 1953 (= made ​queen).

crown verb [T] (COVER TOOTH)

to ​place an ​artificial, tooth-shaped ​piece over a ​tooth, esp. if the ​naturaltooth is ​damaged: She had her two ​frontteeth crowned.

crown verb [T] (BE TOP PART)

to be on or around the ​top of something: mountains crowned with ​snowycaps
(Definition of crown from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of crown?
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website
Word of the Day
faith school

a school that is financially supported by a particular religious group, usually for children from that religion

Word of the Day

Introducing a new author and a new weekly blog post!
Introducing a new author and a new weekly blog post!
by Cambridge Dictionaries Online,
August 27, 2015
The English language is constantly changing. You know that. But did you know that at Cambridge Dictionaries Online we keep track of the changes? We continually add new words and new meanings to our online dictionary for learners of English. Some of them are new to English entirely (neologisms), and some

Read More 

hyperpalatable adjective
hyperpalatable adjective
August 24, 2015
describes food with heightened levels of sugar and salt, intended to be extremely appealing In Brazil, where the prevalence of overweight and obese adults has doubled since 1980, crisps, biscuits, energy bars and sugary drinks formulated to be ‘hyper-palatable’ are much more widely eaten than previously.

Read More