curve Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo
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Meaning of “curve” in the English Dictionary

"curve" in British English

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curvenoun [C]

uk   /kɜːv/ us   /kɝːv/
B2 a line that bends continuously and has no straight parts: a curve in the road the curve of a graph
the curved shape in which a ball moves when it is hit or kicked in a particular way: The ball swung into a reverse curve.

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curveverb [I]

uk   /kɜːv/ us   /kɝːv/
(Definition of curve from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"curve" in American English

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curveverb [I/T]

us   /kɜrv/
to form or move in the direction of a line that turns continuously and has no straight parts, or to cause something to do this: [I] The road curves around the cemetery.
curve
noun [C] us   /kɜrv/
a curve in a road
(Definition of curve from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"curve" in Business English

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curvenoun [C]

uk   /kɜːv/ us  
GRAPHS & CHARTS a line on a graph that shows a relationship between two sets of information, for example changes in price over time: Copper looks like it has reached the top of its price curve.a falling/downward curve Research spending has been on a falling curve. a rising/upward curvea steep/smooth/sharp curve Climate change appears to demand we put our electricity usage on a steep downward curve.
ahead of the curve
more advanced, or developing, understanding something, or reaching a point more quickly than other things or people: The ability to speak two languages puts you ahead of the curve in the job market.
behind the curve
less advanced, or developing, understanding something, or reaching a point more slowly than other things or people: The latest price indices are well behind the curve and have not yet picked up dramatic changes in consumer confidence.
(Definition of curve from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“curve” in British English

“curve” in American English

“curve” in Business English

Avoiding common errors with the word enough.
Avoiding common errors with the word enough.
by ,
May 25, 2016
by Liz Walter Enough is a very common word, but it is easy to make mistakes with it. You need to be careful about its position in a sentence, and the prepositions or verb patterns that come after it. I’ll start with the position of enough in the sentence. When we use it with a noun,

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