Meaning of “curve” in the English Dictionary

"curve" in British English

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curvenoun [ C ]

uk /kɜːv/ us /kɝːv/

B2 a line that bends continuously and has no straight parts:

a curve in the road
the curve of a graph

the curved shape in which a ball moves when it is hit or kicked in a particular way:

The ball swung into a reverse curve.

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curveverb [ I ]

uk /kɜːv/ us /kɝːv/

(Definition of “curve” from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"curve" in American English

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curveverb [ I/T ]

us /kɜrv/

to form or move in the direction of a line that turns continuously and has no straight parts, or to cause something to do this:

[ I ] The road curves around the cemetery.
curve
noun [ C ] us /kɜrv/

a curve in a road

(Definition of “curve” from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"curve" in Business English

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curvenoun [ C ]

uk /kɜːv/ us

GRAPHS & CHARTS a line on a graph that shows a relationship between two sets of information, for example changes in price over time:

Copper looks like it has reached the top of its price curve.
a falling/downward curve Research spending has been on a falling curve.
a rising/upward curve
a steep/smooth/sharp curve Climate change appears to demand we put our electricity usage on a steep downward curve.
ahead of the curve

more advanced, or developing, understanding something, or reaching a point more quickly than other things or people:

The ability to speak two languages puts you ahead of the curve in the job market.
behind the curve

less advanced, or developing, understanding something, or reaching a point more slowly than other things or people:

The latest price indices are well behind the curve and have not yet picked up dramatic changes in consumer confidence.

(Definition of “curve” from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)