date Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo

Meaning of “date” in the English Dictionary

"date" in British English

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datenoun [C]

uk   us   /deɪt/
  • date noun [C] (DAY)

A1 a numberedday in a ​month, often given with a ​combination of the ​name of the ​day, the ​month, and the ​year: What's the date (today)?/What date is it?/What's today's date?UK Today's date is 11 ​June (the eleventh of ​June).US Today's date is ​June 11 (​June the eleventh). What is ​your date of ​birth? The closing date for ​applications is the end of this ​month. We ​agreed to ​meet again at a ​later date. I'd like to fix a date for ​our next ​meeting. I made a date (= ​agreed a date and ​time) to ​see her about the ​house. a ​particularyear: The date on the ​coin is 1789. Albert Einstein's dates are 1879 to 1955 (= he was ​born in 1879 and ​died in 1955). a ​month and a ​year: The expiry (US expiration) date of this ​certificate is ​August 2017.

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  • date noun [C] (MEETING)

B1 a ​socialmeetingplanned before it ​happens, ​especially one between two ​people who have or might have a ​romanticrelationship: He ​asked her out on a date. She has a hot date (= an ​excitingmeeting)tonight. mainly US a ​person you have a ​romanticmeeting with: Who's ​your date for the ​prom?

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  • We went out on a date.
  • I've got a date with someone from ​worktonight.
  • I ​know she's going to the ​cinema with him ​tonight but I don't ​know if it's a date as such.
  • I went there on a date with a ​boy I used to ​know.
  • So who's ​your date ​tonight?
  • date noun [C] (PERFORMANCE)

a ​performance: They've just ​finished an ​exhausting 75-date ​Europeantour.

dateverb

uk   us   /deɪt/
  • date verb (TIME)

B1 [T] to write the day's date on something you have written or made: [+ obj + noun ] Thank you for ​yourletter dated 30 ​August. [T] to say how ​long something has ​existed or when it was made: Archaeologists have been ​unable to date these ​fossils. An ​antiquedealer had dated the ​vase at (= said that it was made in) 1734.

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  • date verb (MEET)

B1 [I or T] mainly US to ​regularlyspendtime with someone you have a ​romanticrelationship with: They dated for five ​years before they got ​married. How ​long have you been dating Nicky?

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Phrasal verbs
(Definition of date from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"date" in American English

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datenoun [C]

 us   /deɪt/
  • date noun [C] (DAY)

a ​numberedday in a ​month, often given with the ​name of the ​month or with the ​month and the ​year: Today’s date is ​June 24, 1998. We ​agreed to ​meet again at a ​later date. Please ​fill in ​your date of ​birth on the ​applicationform. I’ve made a date (= ​agreed to a date and ​time) to ​see her about the ​house.
  • date noun [C] (MEETING)

a ​socialmeetingplanned in ​advance: We made a date to ​meet Evelyn and Josie at ​noontomorrow for ​lunch. A date is a ​person you are ​planning to ​meetsocially and in whom you might have a ​romanticinterest: Who is ​your date for the ​prom?
  • date noun [C] (FRUIT)

the ​sweet, ​brownfruit of ​varioustypes of ​palmtree
Idioms

dateverb [I/T]

 us   /deɪt/
  • date verb [I/T] (WRITE DATE)

to write the day's date on something you have written or made: [T] The last ​letter I ​received from the ​insurancecompany was dated ​August 30, 1999. [I] This ​signature dates from (= originated at the ​time of) the 1800s.
  • date verb [I/T] (MEET SOCIALLY)

to ​regularlyspendtime with someone you have a ​romanticrelationship with: [I] They dated for five ​years before they got ​married.
(Definition of date from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"date" in Business English

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datenoun [C]

uk   us   /deɪt/
a particular day of a particular month, shown in ​numbers, or words and ​numbers: "What date is the next ​meeting?" "It's Thursday, October 1st." The Danish ​government has set a date for a referendum on the matter. The decision on the ​merger will be taken at a later date .
to date up to the ​presenttime: Some 3,800 ​pieces of the new ​software have been ​sold to date.

dateverb [T]

uk   us   /deɪt/
to put a particular day's date on something: The ​demand must be dated and ​signed by the ​creditor. I write with ​reference to your ​letter dated 30 March.
(Definition of date from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“date” in Business English

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