dawn Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo

Meaning of “dawn” in the English Dictionary

"dawn" in British English

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dawnnoun [C or U]

uk   /dɔːn/  us   /dɑːn/
B2 the ​period in the ​day when ​light from the ​sunbegins to ​appear in the ​sky: We ​woke at dawn. We ​left as dawn was breaking (= ​starting). We ​left at the break of dawn.the dawn of sth C1 literary the ​start of a ​period of ​time or the ​beginning of something new: The ​fall of the Berlin Wall ​marked the dawn of a new ​era in ​Europeanhistory.from dawn to dusk from early ​morning until ​night: We ​worked from dawn to ​dusk, seven ​days a ​week.

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dawnverb [I]

uk   /dɔːn/  us   /dɑːn/
(Definition of dawn from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"dawn" in American English

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dawnnoun

 us   /dɔn, dɑn/
the ​period in the ​day when ​light from the ​sunbegins to ​appear in the ​sky: [U] fig. Computers ​mark the dawn of a new ​age.

dawnverb [I]

 /dɔn, dɑn/
(of a ​day or ​period of ​time) to ​begin: Winston ​left his ​house as the ​day was dawning.
Phrasal verbs
(Definition of dawn from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
Translations of “dawn”
in Korean 새벽…
in Arabic فَجْر…
in Malaysian permulaan…
in French poindre…
in Russian рассвет…
in Chinese (Traditional) 拂曉,破曉,黎明…
in Italian alba…
in Turkish şafak vakti, seher vakti…
in Polish świt…
in Spanish amanecer…
in Vietnamese bình minh…
in Portuguese amanhecer…
in Thai เริ่มขึ้น…
in German dämmern…
in Catalan alba…
in Japanese 夜明け…
in Chinese (Simplified) 拂晓,破晓,黎明…
in Indonesian mulai muncul…
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“dawn” in American English

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