decline Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo

Meaning of “decline” in the English Dictionary

"decline" in British English

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declineverb

uk   us   /dɪˈklaɪn/
  • decline verb (GO DOWN)

B2 [I] to ​graduallybecome less, ​worse, or ​lower: His ​interest in the ​project declined after his ​wifedied. The party's ​popularity has declined in the ​opinionpolls.formal The ​land declines ​sharply away from the ​house.

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  • decline verb (REFUSE)

B2 [I or T] formal to ​refuse: I ​invited him to the ​meeting but he declined. He declined my ​offer. [+ to infinitive] They declined totell me how they had ​obtained my ​address.

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  • decline verb (GRAMMAR)

[I or T] specialized language If a ​noun, pronoun, or ​adjective declines, it has different ​forms to show if it is the ​subject or ​object, etc. of a ​verb or if it is ​singular or ​plural, etc. If you decline such a word, you ​listitsvariousforms: In ​Latin we ​learned how to decline ​nouns.

declinenoun [S or U]

uk   us   /dɪˈklaɪn/
B2 when something ​becomes less in ​amount, ​importance, ​quality, or ​strength: industrial decline Home ​cookingseems to be on the/in decline (= not so many ​people are doing it). a decline in the ​number of ​unemployed She ​seemed to be ​recovering and then she went into a decline.

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(Definition of decline from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"decline" in American English

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declineverb

 us   /dɪˈklɑɪn/
  • decline verb (GO DOWN)

[I] to go down in ​amount or ​quality; ​lessen or ​weaken: His ​interest in the ​project declined after his ​wifedied. Her ​health declined ​quickly.
  • decline verb (REFUSE)

[I/T] to ​refuse something: [T] She declined ​theirjoboffer.

declinenoun [C/U]

 us   /dɪˈklɑɪn/
  • decline noun [C/U] (GOING DOWN)

a ​change to a ​loweramount; the ​process of ​becoming less in ​quality or ​strength: [C usually sing] Unemployment ​increased this ​month after a ​modest decline. [U] Civilization is in decline.
(Definition of decline from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"decline" in Business English

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declineverb [I]

uk   us   /dɪˈklaɪn/
to become less, worse, or ​lower in ​value: Milk ​production could decline by 15% or more in the late summer months. declining ​prices/​profits/​sales/​interestrates Even though ​interestrates could decline further, they are now near their ​lowestpoint. decline ​sharply/rapidly/dramatically decline gradually/​steadily/slowly Among ​economists, the widespread view is that the ​dollar will ​keep declining.
to make less ​profit, or ​produce less: a declining economy/industry/market The ​plan will ​reduceprofits for the declining ​commercial fishing ​industry.

declinenoun [C or U]

uk   us   /dɪˈklaɪn/
a ​reduction in the ​value or ​amount of something, for ​example a ​currency or ​sales: If ​sustained, the yen's 12.5% decline against the ​dollar this month may damp ​inflation across the ​region. A ​quarter of ​manufacturersreported a decline inproduction. The ​housingindustryexperienced a decline insales. a rapid/​sharp/​steep/​marked decline a slight/​slow/gradual decline
a ​situation in which a ​company, country, or ​financialmarket gradually becomes less ​valuable, makes less ​profit, or ​produces less: Further ​economic decline might provoke spontaneous popular ​protest. Little was being done to reverse the decline in the town's ​touristeconomy. The ​industry has been in decline for decades.
(Definition of decline from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“decline” in Business English

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