deflate Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo
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Meaning of “deflate” in the English Dictionary

"deflate" in British English

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deflateverb

uk   /dɪˈfleɪt/ us   /dɪˈfleɪt/
(Definition of deflate from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"deflate" in American English

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deflateverb [I/T]

us   /dɪˈfleɪt/
to allow air or gas to escape from within a container: [T] When the roads are icy, you may have to deflate your tires a bit.
fig. Someone or something that is deflated suddenly feels or is considered less important: [T] The allegations deflate the respect people have for the presidency.
(Definition of deflate from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"deflate" in Business English

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deflateverb [I or T]

uk   /dɪˈfleɪt/ us  
ECONOMICS when an economy deflates or is deflated, prices fall and there is a reduction in wages and government spending, and low levels of growth: The chancellor will have to keep rates high and deflate the economy to keep the lid on prices and finance the trade deficit. The fear is that economies fueled by aid dollars will deflate after international agencies leave.
to reduce the value or price of something, or to become less valuable or expensive: Some people are angry, arguing that the state has artificially deflated housing values in the area. Over the past ten years, telecom prices have deflated by 50% while levels of competition have never been more intense.
(Definition of deflate from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“deflate” in Business English

Avoiding common errors with the word enough.
Avoiding common errors with the word enough.
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May 25, 2016
by Liz Walter Enough is a very common word, but it is easy to make mistakes with it. You need to be careful about its position in a sentence, and the prepositions or verb patterns that come after it. I’ll start with the position of enough in the sentence. When we use it with a noun,

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