Meaning of “degree” in the English Dictionary

"degree" in British English

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degreenoun

uk /dɪˈɡriː/ us /dɪˈɡriː/

degree noun (AMOUNT)

B2 [ C usually singular, U ] (an) amount or level of something:

This job demands a high degree of skill.
There isn't the slightest degree of doubt that he's innocent.
I have to warn you that there's a degree of (= some) danger involved in this.
The number of terrorist attacks has increased to a terrifying degree.
There was some degree of truth in what she said.
To what degree do you think we will be providing a better service?
"That's really bad." "Well, it's all a matter/question of degree (= there are other things better and other things worse)."

More examples

  • Courts can show a considerable degree of latitude when it comes to applying the law.
  • We can predict changes with a surprising degree of accuracy.
  • I like modern art to a certain degree, but I don't like the really experimental stuff.
  • It is impossible to predict the outcome of the negotiations with any degree of certitude.
  • Individuals with even a small degree of emotional intelligence are a dream to work for.

degree noun (UNIT)

A2 [ C ] written abbreviation deg. any of various units of measurement, especially of temperature or angles, usually shown by the symbol ° written after a number:

a difference of three degrees
Water boils at 212° Fahrenheit and 100° Celsius/Centigrade.
A right angle is an angle of 90°.
New York is on a latitude of 41°N and a longitude of 74°W.

More examples

  • The average temperature worldwide has risen by about one degree Fahrenheit in the past 100 years.
  • The boat settled into the mud at a 35 degree angle/an angle of 35 degrees.
  • The temperature is expected to drop to ten degrees below zero tonight.
  • It's two degrees outside, but with the wind-chill factor, it feels like minus five.
  • The thermometer recorded a temperature of 30 degrees Celsius.

degree noun (SUBJECT OF STUDY)

B1 [ C ] a course of study at a college or university, or the qualification given to a student after he or she has completed his or her studies:

She has a physics degree/a degree in physics from Edinburgh.
mainly US She has a bachelor's/master's degree in history from Yale.
UK "What degree did you do at York?" "Geography."

More examples

  • A degree in computer science offers a fast track to the top.
  • At work she kept up the fiction that she had a university degree.
  • Adrian has a double honours degree in English and philosophy.
  • Gone are the days when a university degree was a meal ticket for life.
  • There is a predominance of people with an arts degree on the board of governors.

-degreesuffix

uk / -dɪ.ɡriː/ us / -dɪ.ɡriː/

(Definition of “degree” from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"degree" in American English

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degreenoun

us /dɪˈɡri/

degree noun (AMOUNT)

[ C/U ] an amount or level of something:

[ C ] This job demands a high degree of skill.
[ C ] The house had also been damaged, but to a lesser degree.

degree noun (TEMPERATURE UNIT)

[ C ] symbol ° a unit of measurement of temperature, often shown by the symbol ° written after a number:

The temperature is expected to climb to 90° tomorrow.

degree noun (ANGLE MEASUREMENT)

geometry [ C ] symbol ° a unit of measurement of angles, often shown by the symbol ° written after a number

degree noun (NUMBER)

[ C ] algebra an exponent (= number that shows how many times another number is to be multiplied by itself)

degree of a monomial

A degree of a monomial is the total of the exponents in a mathematical statement.

degree of a polynomial

A degree of a polynomial is the largest of the exponents in a mathematical statement.

degree noun (ACHIEVEMENT)

[ C ] the level of achievement recognized for a student who has completed a course of study at a college or university:

She earned a bachelor’s degree in history from Yale.

(Definition of “degree” from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)