deliver Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Meaning of “deliver” in the English Dictionary

"deliver" in British English

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deliververb

uk   /dɪˈlɪv.ər/  us   //

deliver verb (TAKE)

B1 [T] to take ​goods, ​letters, ​parcels, etc. to people's ​houses or ​places of ​work: Mail is delivered toourofficetwice a ​day. The ​furniturestore is delivering ​our new ​bed on ​Thursday.
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deliver verb (GIVE)

B2 [T] to give, ​direct, or ​aim something: The ​priest delivered a ​passionate sermon/​speech against ​war. The ​jury delivered a verdict of not ​guilty. The ​police said that it was the blow delivered (= given) to her ​head that ​killed her. The ​pitchertripped as he delivered the ​ball (= ​threw it towards the ​person with the ​bat).
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deliver verb (PRODUCE)

C1 [I or T] to ​achieve or ​produce something that has been ​promised: The ​government has ​failed to deliver (what it ​promised).mainly US The Republicans are relying on ​theiragriculturalpolicies to deliver the ​farmers' ​vote (= to ​persuadefarmers to ​vote for them).
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deliver verb (GIVE BIRTH)

[T] to (​help) give ​birth to a ​baby: She delivered her third ​child at ​home. The ​baby was delivered by a ​midwife.formal The ​princess has been delivered of (= has given ​birth to) a ​healthybabyboy.

deliver verb (SAVE)

[T] formal to ​save someone from a ​painful or ​badexperience: Is there nothing that can be done to deliver these ​starvingpeople fromtheirsuffering?
deliverance
noun [U] uk   us   /-əns/ formal
We ​pray for deliverance fromoursins.
deliverer
noun [C] uk   /r/  us   // formal
Moses was the deliverer of the Israelites from Egypt.
(Definition of deliver from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"deliver" in American English

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deliververb

 us   /dɪˈlɪv·ər/

deliver verb (TAKE TO)

[I/T] to take ​goods, ​letters, or ​packages to people’s ​houses or ​places of ​work: [T] We had the ​pizza delivered. [T] We ​callourpharmacy with the doctor’s ​prescription and ​ask them to deliver it. [I] We deliver ​anywhere in the ​city.

deliver verb (GIVE)

[T] to give or ​produce a ​speech or ​result: The ​president is ​scheduled to deliver a ​speech on ​foreignpolicy. The ​jury delivered a ​verdict of not ​guilty.

deliver verb (GIVE BIRTH)

[T] to give ​birth to a ​baby, or to ​help someone do this: Dr. Adams delivered all three of my ​children.

deliver verb (PRODUCE)

[I/T] to ​achieve or ​produce something ​promised or ​expected: [I] You ​payyourdues, and you ​expect the ​union to deliver.
(Definition of deliver from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"deliver" in Business English

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deliververb

uk   us   /dɪˈlɪvər/
[I or T] to take ​goods, ​letters, ​parcels, etc. to a ​place: deliver goods/mail/products Manufacturers can deliver ​goods directly from ​factories. Most ​stores will deliver between 8 a.m. and 8 p.m.deliver sth to sb/sth Together, the three ​groups deliver 340,000 ​meals a ​year to homebound ​people.
[T] to ​provide a ​service: We want world-class ​wages and ​conditions for our ​people to ​match the ​worldclassservices that they deliver. The ​company is ​working tirelessly to deliver ​improvedservices for ​passengers.
[I or T] to ​achieve, ​provide, or ​produce something: The ​pricewars we see among ​retailers are a ​directresult of their need to ​maximisemarketshare and deliver ​profits to ​shareholders.deliver a rise/increase in sth We have been able to deliver a 40% ​rise in ​revenues and ​profits for the seventh successive ​year. deliver ​growth/​returns/​savings deliver ​benefits/​results/​improvements
[I] to do something that has been promised: The ​maincomplaint from ​analysts is that the ​company says all the ​right things but fails to deliver. In particular, critics ​cite his ​failure to deliver on a promise to ​attract half-a-million ​customers for the new ​service by last summer.
[I or T] to ​manufacture and ​supply something to a ​customer: Boeing ​predicts that ​manufacturers will deliver 28,600 ​airplanesworth $2.8 ​trillion by 2026. Our ​keyaim is to deliver aquality product to the ​consumer. Officials say the ​merger should be ​invisible, as the new ​company will continue to deliver electricity and ​gas to ​customers and be ​regulated by the same body.
[T] to make a speech or an ​officialstatement: deliver a briefing/report/speech She is ​due to deliver a ​keynote speech tofinanceministers this afternoon. The water ​industryregulator is ​due to deliver his verdict on the ​proposedtakeover today.
deliver content to ​provideinformation, ​text, and pictures for a ​book, ​website, etc.: The ​digitalentertainmentcompany is ​working with ​hardwarecompanies, ​trying to come up with ​technologies to deliver ​content the way they ​thinkconsumers want to see it.
deliver a blow to sb/sth to have a ​damagingeffect on someone or something: This ​move is going to continue to deliver a ​blow to the ​company and its ​position in the ​industry.
deliver the goods informal to do what you have promised to do, or to ​produce what is wanted: The ​company expects ​employees to ​perform and to deliver the ​goods.
(Definition of deliver from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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