delivery Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo
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Meaning of “delivery” in the English Dictionary

"delivery" in British English

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deliverynoun

uk   /dɪˈlɪv.ər.i/  us   /dɪˈlɪv.ɚ.i/
  • delivery noun (LETTERS, ETC.)

B1 [C or U] the ​act of taking ​goods, ​letters, ​parcels, etc. to people's ​houses or ​places of ​work: We get two deliveries ofmail (= it is ​deliveredtwice) a ​day. You can ​pay for the ​carpet on delivery (= when it is ​delivered). We ​expect to take delivery of (= ​receive)our new ​car next ​week. a delivery van

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  • delivery noun (GIVING)

[S] the way in which someone ​speaks in ​public: the actor's delivery
[C or U] in some ​sports, such as ​cricket or ​baseball, the ​act of ​throwing the ​ball towards the ​person with the bat, in ​order for that ​person to ​try to ​hit the ​ball: That was a good delivery from Thompson. The ​pitcher is ​famous for the ​speed of his delivery.
(Definition of delivery from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"delivery" in American English

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deliverynoun

 us   /dɪˈlɪv·ə·ri/
  • delivery noun (TAKING GOODS)

[C/U] the ​act of taking ​goods, ​letters, or ​packages to people's ​houses or ​places of ​work: [C] The ​company gets two deliveries a ​day. [U] You can ​pay for the ​rug on delivery (= when it is ​received).
  • delivery noun (WAY OF SPEAKING)

[U] the ​manner in which someone ​speaks, esp. in ​public: His ​dialogue was ​offbeat, his delivery ​fast.
  • delivery noun (BIRTH)

[C] the ​act or ​process of ​birth: She had a ​difficult delivery.
(Definition of delivery from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"delivery" in Business English

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deliverynoun

uk   us   /dɪˈlɪvəri/
[C or U] the ​act of taking ​goods, ​letters, ​parcels, etc. to a ​place: Please allow 14 days for delivery. mail/​parcel/​postal delivery a delivery ​driver/​truck/vanon delivery There's a 10% ​deposit to be ​paid, and then the ​balance has to be ​paid on delivery of the ​car.next-day/same-day/overnight delivery The ​company has ​establishedlinks with florists across the UK for a ​same-day delivery ​service. express/​free delivery The ​supermarketrose to the ​challenge with ​costcuts and ​successfulexpansion into ​internetsales and home delivery. delivery ​address/​charges/​terms They make two deliveries a day.
[C] an ​amount of ​goods received: There were several ​faultyitems in the last delivery.
[U] the ​act of ​providing a ​service or ​supplying something to a ​customer: The new ​proposals will ​allow the delivery of ​high-speedinternetaccess without a ​phoneline. Providing ​targetedmedicaladvice over the ​internet is the ​highestlevel yet of what the ​governmentcalls the electronic delivery of ​publicservices.
[U] LAW a ​situation in which a ​buyer is given ​control of something they have ​bought: For a ​deed to convey ​ownership, there must be delivery and ​acceptance.
[U] FINANCE used in the ​trading of futures to ​talk about the ​date when the ​shares or commodities (= ​goods) will be ​available to the ​buyer: The ​price of ​gold for December delivery ​fell 20 ​cents an ​ounce.
take delivery of sth
to receive ​goods that you have ​bought: Once the ​fashion show ​finishes, ​departmentstorebuyers will choose, ​order, and take delivery of clothes from all over the ​world.
(Definition of delivery from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“delivery” in Business English

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