Meaning of “delivery” in the English Dictionary

"delivery" in British English

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deliverynoun

uk /dɪˈlɪv.ər.i/ us /dɪˈlɪv.ɚ.i/

delivery noun (LETTERS, ETC.)

B1 [ C or U ] the act of taking goods, letters, parcels, etc. to people's houses or places of work:

We get two deliveries of mail (= it is delivered twice) a day.
You can pay for the carpet on delivery (= when it is delivered).
We expect to take delivery of (= receive) our new car next week.
a delivery van

More examples

  • You have to allow for a time lag between order and delivery.
  • Our head office will liaise with the suppliers to ensure delivery.
  • Please send this letter by express delivery.
  • $200 is payable immediately with a further $100 payable on delivery.
  • They've decided to hold all future deliveries until the invoice has been paid.

delivery noun (GIVING)

[ S ] the way in which someone speaks in public:

the actor's delivery

[ C or U ] in some sports, such as cricket or baseball, the act of throwing the ball towards the person with the bat, in order for that person to try to hit the ball:

That was a good delivery from Thompson.
The pitcher is famous for the speed of his delivery.

(Definition of “delivery” from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"delivery" in American English

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deliverynoun

us /dɪˈlɪv·ə·ri/

delivery noun (TAKING GOODS)

[ C/U ] the act of taking goods, letters, or packages to people's houses or places of work:

[ C ] The company gets two deliveries a day.
[ U ] You can pay for the rug on delivery (= when it is received).

delivery noun (WAY OF SPEAKING)

[ U ] the manner in which someone speaks, esp. in public:

His dialogue was offbeat, his delivery fast.

delivery noun (BIRTH)

[ C ] the act or process of birth:

She had a difficult delivery.

(Definition of “delivery” from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"delivery" in Business English

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deliverynoun

uk /dɪˈlɪvəri/ us

[ C or U ] the act of taking goods, letters, parcels, etc. to a place:

Please allow 14 days for delivery.
mail/parcel/postal delivery
a delivery driver/truck/van
on delivery There's a 10% deposit to be paid, and then the balance has to be paid on delivery of the car.
next-day/same-day/overnight delivery The company has established links with florists across the UK for a same-day delivery service.
express/free delivery
The supermarket rose to the challenge with cost cuts and successful expansion into internet sales and home delivery.
They make two deliveries a day.

[ C ] an amount of goods received:

There were several faulty items in the last delivery.

[ U ] the act of providing a service or supplying something to a customer:

The new proposals will allow the delivery of high-speed internet access without a phone line.
Providing targeted medical advice over the internet is the highest level yet of what the government calls the electronic delivery of public services.

[ U ] LAW a situation in which a buyer is given control of something they have bought:

For a deed to convey ownership, there must be delivery and acceptance.

[ U ] FINANCE used in the trading of futures to talk about the date when the shares or commodities (= goods) will be available to the buyer:

The price of gold for December delivery fell 20 cents an ounce.
take delivery of sth

to receive goods that you have bought:

Once the fashion show finishes, department store buyers will choose, order, and take delivery of clothes from all over the world.

(Definition of “delivery” from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)