depreciation Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo

Meaning of “depreciation” in the English Dictionary

"depreciation" in British English

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depreciationnoun [U]

uk   us   /dɪˌpriː.ʃiˈeɪ.ʃən/
the ​process of ​losingvalue
(Definition of depreciation from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"depreciation" in Business English

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depreciationnoun [U]

uk   us   /dɪˌpriːʃiˈeɪʃən/
ACCOUNTING, TAX the ​amount by which something, such as a ​piece of ​equipment, is ​reduced in ​value in a company's ​financialaccounts, over the ​period of ​time it has been in use. The ​loss in ​valuereduces a company's ​profits, and the ​amount of ​tax it must ​pay: accelerated depreciation Expenses ​include depreciation of ​equipment as well as ​businessinsurance. a depreciation ​charge/​deduction
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ACCOUNTING the ​practice of ​spreading the ​cost of capitalexpenditure over several ​years, especially in ​order to ​improve cashflow
MONEY, FINANCE the ​amount by which a ​currencylosesvalue in comparison with other ​currencies: The depreciation of the ​dollar affected the British ​economy. the depreciation of ​sterling against the ​euro Depreciation in the peso since last December could dent ​sales and ​cutprofit.
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FINANCE, INSURANCE a ​loss of ​value, especially over ​time: After three ​years, this ​car is ​projected to be ​worth 57% of its ​price when new - one of the ​lowest rates of depreciation of any ​car in any ​class. The ​insuranceguarantees that the ​goods will be ​replaced at their ​presentmarketvalue, without any ​deduction for depreciation.
(Definition of depreciation from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
Translations of “depreciation”
in Chinese (Simplified) 贬值,跌价…
in Chinese (Traditional) 貶值,跌價…
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“depreciation” in Business English

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