depreciation Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo
Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

Meaning of “depreciation” in the English Dictionary

(Definition of depreciation from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"depreciation" in Business English

See all translations

depreciationnoun [U]

uk   us   /dɪˌpriːʃiˈeɪʃən/
ACCOUNTING, TAX the amount by which something, such as a piece of equipment, is reduced in value in a company's financial accounts, over the period of time it has been in use. The loss in value reduces a company's profits, and the amount of tax it must pay: accelerated depreciation Expenses include depreciation of equipment as well as business insurance. a depreciation charge/deduction
Compare
ACCOUNTING the practice of spreading the cost of capital expenditure over several years, especially in order to improve cash flow
MONEY, FINANCE the amount by which a currency loses value in comparison with other currencies: The depreciation of the dollar affected the British economy. the depreciation of sterling against the euro Depreciation in the peso since last December could dent sales and cut profit.
Compare
FINANCE, INSURANCE a loss of value, especially over time: After three years, this car is projected to be worth 57% of its price when new - one of the lowest rates of depreciation of any car in any class. The insurance guarantees that the goods will be replaced at their present market value, without any deduction for depreciation.
(Definition of depreciation from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
Translations of “depreciation”
in Chinese (Simplified) 贬值,跌价…
in Chinese (Traditional) 貶值,跌價…
What is the pronunciation of depreciation?
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website

“depreciation” in Business English

A bunch of stuff about plurals
A bunch of stuff about plurals
by ,
May 24, 2016
by Colin McIntosh One of the many ways in which English differs from other languages is its use of uncountable nouns to talk about collections of objects: as well as never being used in the plural, they’re never used with a or an. Examples are furniture (plural in German and many other languages), cutlery (plural in Italian), and

Read More 

Word of the Day

shade

to prevent direct light from shining on something

Word of the Day

convo noun
convo noun
May 23, 2016
informal a conversation The convo around concussions mostly focuses on guys who play football, but Chastain thinks that this whole thing could be a headache for women too.

Read More