depth Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary

Meaning of “depth” in the English Dictionary

"depth" in British English

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uk   us   /depθ/

depth noun (DISTANCE DOWN)

B1 [C or U] the ​distance down either from the ​top of something to the ​bottom, or to a ​distance below the ​topsurface of something: the depth of a ​lake/​pond There are very few ​fish at depths (= ​distances below the ​surface) below 3,000 ​metres. The ​riverfroze to a depth of over a ​metre.the depths [plural] literary the ​lowestpart of the ​sea: The ​shipsankslowly to the depths of the ​ocean.
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depth noun (SERIOUSNESS)

B2 [C or U] the ​state of having ​seriousqualities or the ​ability to ​thinkseriously about something: Terry lacks depth - he's a very ​superficialperson. Her writing ​showsastonishing depth. Jo has hidden depths (= ​seriousqualities that you do not ​seeimmediately).in depth B2 in a ​serious and ​detailed way: I'd like to ​look at this ​question in some depth.
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[C or U] the ​distance from the ​front to the back of something: Measure the depth of the ​cupboard/​shelf.

depth noun (STRENGTH)

C2 [C or U] the ​fact of a ​feeling, ​state, or ​characteristic being ​strong, ​extreme, or ​detailed: He ​spoke with ​great depth offeeling. I was ​amazed at the depth of her the depth(s) of sth experiencing an ​extreme and ​negativeemotion: He was in the depths of despair/​depression about ​losing his ​job. during the ​worstperiod of a ​badsituation: The ​company was ​started in the depth of the ​recession of the 1930s.

depth noun (LOW SOUND)

[U] the ​quality of having a ​lowsound: The depth of his ​voice makes him ​soundolder than he is.

depth noun (DARKNESS)

[U] the ​fact of something, ​especially a ​colour, having the ​quality of being ​dark and ​strong: I ​love the depth ofcolour in her early ​paintings.
(Definition of depth from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"depth" in American English

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depthnoun [C/U]

 us   /depθ/

depth noun [C/U] (DISTANCE DOWN)

the ​distance down from the ​topsurface of something to the ​bottom: [C] They were ​scubadiving at a depth of 22 ​meters. [U] The ​numbers on the ​left show the depth in ​inches.

depth noun [C/U] (DISTANCE BACKWARD)

the ​distance from the ​front to the back of something: [U] Bookshelves should be at least nine ​inches in depth.

depth noun [C/U] (STRENGTH)

the ​strength, ​quality, or ​degree of being ​complete: [U] It’s hard to get a ​handle on the depth of her ​knowledge.

depth noun [C/U] (SERIOUSNESS)

the ​ability to ​think seriously about something: [U] Don’t ​look for depth in this depth Something done in depth is done ​carefully and in ​greatdetail: I interviewed her in depth. an in-depth ​report
(Definition of depth from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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