Meaning of “derivative” in the English Dictionary

"derivative" in British English

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derivativeadjective

uk /dɪˈrɪv.ə.tɪv/ us /dɪˈrɪv.ə.t̬ɪv/ disapproving

derivativenoun [ C ]

uk /dɪˈrɪv.ɪ.tɪv/ us /dɪˈrɪv.ə.t̬ɪv/

derivative noun [ C ] (FINANCIAL PRODUCT)

specialized finance & economics a financial product such as an option (= the right to buy or sell something in the future) that has a value based on the value of another product, such as shares or bonds

(Definition of “derivative” from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"derivative" in American English

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derivativeadjective

us /dɪˈrɪv·ə·t̬ɪv/

having qualities taken from something else:

Too much of the music feels derivative.

derivativenoun [ C ]

us /dɪˈrɪv·ə·t̬ɪv/

something made from something else:

Retinol is a derivative of vitamin A.

grammar A derivative is also a word that is made from another word.

(Definition of “derivative” from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"derivative" in Business English

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derivativenoun [ C, usually plural ]

uk /dɪˈrɪvətɪv/ us also derivative instrument, also derivative product

STOCK MARKET, FINANCE a financial product such as an option (= the right to buy or sell something in the future) that has a value based on the value of another asset, such as shares, or bonds:

GS Financial Products buys and sells derivatives such as swaps and options linked to interest rates, currencies, commodities and indexes.
derivatives trading
In the past 20 years there has been a huge growth in the derivatives markets.

(Definition of “derivative” from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)