development Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Meaning of “development” in the English Dictionary

"development" in British English

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developmentnoun

uk   us   /dɪˈvel.əp.mənt/

development noun (GROWTH)

B1 [U] the ​process in which someone or something ​grows or ​changes and ​becomes more ​advanced: healthygrowth and development The ​documentarytraced the development ofpopularmusic through the ​ages. The ​regionsuffers from ​under-/over-development (= having too little/much ​industry). a development ​project (= one to ​helpimproveindustry) in Pakistan
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development noun (THING THAT HAPPENS)

B2 [C] a ​recentevent that is the ​latest in a ​series of ​relatedevents: an ​important development in the ​fuelcrisis Call me if there are any new developments.

development noun (START)

B1 [U] the ​process of ​developing something new: Mr Berkowitz is in ​charge of product development.

development noun (BUILDINGS)

[C] an ​area on which new ​buildings are ​built in ​order to make a ​profit: a housing development
developmental
adjective uk   /dɪˌvel.əpˈmen.təl/  us   /-t̬əl/
a developmental ​process/​problem
(Definition of development from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"development" in Business English

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developmentnoun

uk   us   /dɪˈveləpmənt/
[U] growth or ​changes that make something become more ​advanced: The first ​year of the ​plan is primarily ​focused on organizational development. He was ​recruited to ​overseeinternational business development.
[U] the ​process of ​creating something such as a new ​product or ​service: software development The next ​stage in the development of this ​productline is a ​retailversion.
[U] the ​process of ​producing a ​plan, ​idea, etc.: Motorola said it did not expect its ​policy, which has been in development since June, to affect its ​bottomline.
[C] a recent ​event which is the latest in a ​series of ​relatedevents: Keeping up with new developments on the web is not ​easy. These beneficial economic developments have ​followedtrade and ​investmentliberalization.
[U] ECONOMICS the ​plannedincrease of a country’s ​industry and ​wealth: The EU has ​exercisedleadership and argued for ​policies that ​support the ​expansion of ​trade, ​growth, and development. development ​projects
[U] HR improvement of a ​skill, ​ability, ​quality, etc.: An ​industryconvention is a terrific ​venue for ​businessskillstraining and professional development. They ​investedresources into ​employee training and development. individual/​career/​staff development
[C] (also UK housing development, also US real estate development) PROPERTY a ​group of similar ​buildingsbuilt in an ​area by a particular developer: They recently ​bought a ​house in one of the town's new developments.
[U] PROPERTY the ​building of ​houses, ​stores, ​offices, etc. usually by a ​company to make a ​profit, usually on an ​area of ​land where there were none before: The ​land will be used for ​private development. He began his ​career at Goldman Sachs and ​moved on to real-estate development in the New York City ​area. commercial/​industrial development
[C or U] NATURAL RESOURCES an ​area of ​land that is used for its ​naturalresources, or the use of an ​area of ​land for its ​naturalresources: Oil ​producers have ​focused their ​efforts on ​optimizingproduction from existing ​fields and ​investing more ​aggressively in new developments.
(Definition of development from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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