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Meaning of “digest” in the English Dictionary

"digest" in British English

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digestverb

uk   /daɪˈdʒest/  us   /daɪˈdʒest/

digestnoun [C]

uk   /ˈdaɪ.dʒest/  us   /ˈdaɪ.dʒest/
(Definition of digest from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"digest" in American English

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digestverb

 us   /dɪˈdʒest, dɑɪ-/
  • digest verb (EAT)

biology [I/T] (of the body of a living creature) to chemically change food into smaller forms that the body can absorb and use: [T] Some people have difficulty digesting milk.
  • digest verb (UNDERSTAND)

[T] to take information into your mind in a way that gives you the ability to use it: He could digest an enormous amount of information with amazing speed.

digestnoun [C]

 us   /ˈdɑɪ·dʒest/
a short written report containing the most important parts of a longer piece, or a short written report of recent news: The Sunday newspaper includes a digest of last week’s major stories.
(Definition of digest from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"digest" in Business English

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digestverb [T]

uk   us   /daɪˈdʒest/
FINANCE if a company digests another company that it has bought, it makes the action successful, so that the new bigger company is able to make a profit, etc: The high street lender has digested the acquisition of fund manager Scottish Widows and is ready for another acquisition.
(Definition of digest from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“digest” in British English

“digest” in American English

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