Meaning of “diminish” in the English Dictionary

"diminish" in British English

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diminishverb [ I or T ]

uk /dɪˈmɪn.ɪʃ/ us /dɪˈmɪn.ɪʃ/

C1 to reduce or be reduced in size or importance:

I don't want to diminish her achievements, but she did have a lot of help.
These memories will not be diminished by time.
What he did has seriously diminished him in many people's eyes.
We've seen our house diminish greatly/sharply/substantially in value over the last six months.

More examples

  • Later on in life the sex drive tends to diminish.
  • Rising unemployment has diminished the bargaining power of people with jobs.
  • The inaccuracy of the missiles greatly diminishes their effectiveness.
  • Her popularity as a singer has diminished since the glory days of the 1980s.
  • Fresh snow meant that our chances of reaching the summit slowly diminished.

(Definition of “diminish” from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"diminish" in American English

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diminishverb [ I/T ]

us /dəˈmɪn·ɪʃ/

to reduce or be reduced in size or importance:

[ I ] The threat of inflation is diminishing.
[ T ] A single-payer system would diminish the bureaucratic cost of health care.
diminution
noun [ C/U ] /ˌdɪm·əˈnu·ʃən/

(Definition of “diminish” from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"diminish" in Business English

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diminishverb [ I or T ]

uk /dɪˈmɪnɪʃ/ us

to reduce or be reduced in size, importance, or value:

Investors can diversify their holdings in order to diminish risk.
Over a period of several years, these securities diminished in value and the corporation went bankrupt.

(Definition of “diminish” from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)