dip Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo
Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

Meaning of “dip” in the English Dictionary

"dip" in British English

See all translations

dipverb

uk   /dɪp/  us   /dɪp/ (-pp-)
  • dip verb (PUT INTO LIQUID)

B2 [T] to put something into a ​liquid for a ​shorttime: Dip the ​fish in the ​batter, then ​drop it into the ​hotoil. She dipped her ​toe into the ​pool to ​see how ​cold it was.
[T] to put ​sheep for a ​shorttime into a ​container of ​liquidcontainingchemicals that ​killharmfulinsects on the sheep's ​bodies

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

expend iconexpend icon Thesaurus

  • dip verb (DROP)

B2 [I] to go down to a ​lowerlevel: As you ​turn the ​corner, the ​road dips ​suddenly. The ​sun dipped below the ​horizon. House ​prices dipped in the first three ​months of the ​year.
[T] UK to make the ​beam from the ​lights at the ​front of a ​vehiclepoint down: You'll ​dazzleoncomingdrivers if you don't dip ​yourheadlights.

dipnoun

uk   /dɪp/  us   /dɪp/
  • dip noun (LIQUID)

[C or U] a ​cold, ​thicksauce that you ​eat by dipping ​pieces of ​uncookedvegetable or ​biscuits, etc. into it
[C usually singular] a ​quickswim: a dip in the ​sea/​pool
[C or U] a ​specialliquid used for ​cleaning, etc.: a ​silver dip sheep dip
(Definition of dip from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"dip" in American English

See all translations

dipverb

 us   /dɪp/ (-pp-)
  • dip verb (PUT INTO LIQUID)

[T] to put something ​briefly into a ​liquid: He dipped his ​doughnut in the ​coffee.
  • dip verb (DROP)

[I] to go down to a ​lowerlevel; ​become less or ​lower: Beans and ​lettuce may ​suffer if ​temperatures dip below ​freezing. Stock ​marketprices dipped ​slightly, ​losing four ​points.
Phrasal verbs

dipnoun

 us   /dɪp/
  • dip noun (DROP)

[C usually sing] a ​smalldrop in the ​amount or ​level of something: After the ​yellowhouse, there’s a dip in the ​road.
  • dip noun (FOOD)

[C] a ​thicksauce you can put ​crackers, ​rawvegetables, etc., into before ​eating them.
[C] A dip is also a ​quickswim: He took a dip in the ​pool.
(Definition of dip from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"dip" in Business English

See all translations

dipverb [I]

uk   us   /dɪp/ (-pp-)
to go down to a ​lowerlevel, often by a ​smallamount or for a ​shorttime: Houseprices are likely to dip in the first three months of the ​year.dip from sth to sth Employment ​gains dipped from 2.6% to only 1.7%. Group ​sales dipped by 4% last ​quarter.
dip a/your toe into sth
to ​start very carefully to do or become involved in something that you are not ​experienced at: Ordinary ​investors need to ​feel they are getting a good ​deal when they dip their toes into the ​stockmarket. If you are ​keen to dip your toes into ​Europeanfunds, there are a ​number to choose from.
dip into your pocket informal
to ​spend some of your ​money on something: She ​admitted that she had been ​forced to dip into her own ​pocket to make up a ​fundingshortfall.
See also
Phrasal verbs

dipnoun [C]

uk   us   /dɪp/
a ​reduction in something, or the fact of something ​moving to a ​lowerlevel: The dip in revenue does not ​mean the industry's several-year ​winningstreak is coming to an end. The ​newspaper is ​reporting the third ​straight monthly dip in ​advertising.suffer/experience a dip Nearly all of our ​members have ​experienced a dip in their ​business this ​year. a ​sharp/slight dip
See also
(Definition of dip from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of dip?
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website

“dip” in Business English

There, their and they’re – which one should you use?
There, their and they’re – which one should you use?
by ,
April 27, 2016
by Liz Walter If you are a learner of English and you are confused about the words there, their and they’re, let me reassure you: many, many people with English as their first language share your problem! You only have to take a look at the ‘comments’ sections on the website of, for example, a popular

Read More 

Word of the Day

sample

a small amount of something that shows you what the rest is or should be like

Word of the Day

bio-banding noun
bio-banding noun
April 25, 2016
in sport, grouping children according to their physical maturity rather than their age ‘When we’re grouping children for sports, we do it by age groups, but the problem is that, within those age groups, we get huge variations in biological age,’ said Dr Sean Cumming, senior lecturer at the University of Bath’s department for

Read More