Meaning of “discipline” in the English Dictionary

"discipline" in English

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disciplinenoun

uk /ˈdɪs.ə.plɪn/ us /ˈdɪs.ə.plɪn/

discipline noun (TRAINING)

B2 [ U ] training that makes people more willing to obey or more able to control themselves, often in the form of rules, and punishments if these are broken, or the behaviour produced by this training:

There should be tougher discipline in schools.
I don't have enough (self) discipline to save money.

[ U ] the ability to control yourself or other people, even in difficult situations:

Maintaining classroom discipline (= control of the students) is the first task of every teacher.

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disciplineverb

uk /ˈdɪs.ə.plɪn/ us /ˈdɪs.ə.plɪn/

(Definition of “discipline” from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"discipline" in American English

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disciplinenoun

us /ˈdɪs·ə·plən, -ˌplɪn/

discipline noun (TRAINING)

[ U ] training that produces obedience or self-control, often in the form of rules and punishments if these are broken, or the obedience or self-control produced by this training:

military discipline

[ U ] Discipline is also the ability to control a mental activity:

Learning a foreign language requires discipline.

discipline noun (SUBJECT)

[ C ] a particular area of study, esp. a subject studied at a college or university:

an academic discipline

disciplineverb [ T ]

us /ˈdɪs·ə·plən, -ˌplɪn/

discipline verb [ T ] (PUNISH)

to punish someone:

He was disciplined for his bad conduct.

(Definition of “discipline” from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"discipline" in Business English

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disciplinenoun

uk /ˈdɪsəplɪn/ us

[ U ] the practice of making sure that people obey rules and do not cause problems:

Personnel rules are used to govern worker conduct and impose discipline on violators.
the strict discipline of prison

[ U ] also self-discipline the ability to make yourself do something, even if it is difficult, so that you can achieve a goal:

the discipline to do sth Working for a large firm gave him the confidence and discipline to start his own business.
For most people, saving money requires a lot of self-discipline.

[ C ] a subject or a particular type of work:

Our company actively recruits graduates for a wide range of disciplines including engineering, science, and business.

disciplineverb [ T ]

uk /ˈdɪsəplɪn/ us

HR to deal with a worker who does not obey company rules, for example by giving them a written warning:

discipline sb for (doing) sth He was disciplined for serious misconduct.

to carefully control the way that you work, live, or behave, especially to achieve a goal:

discipline yourself to do sth Discipline yourself to clear out old files on a regular basis.

(Definition of “discipline” from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

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discipline

I do not deny the fact that there is a great deal of internal reorganisation and that strict budgetary discipline is being exercised.
I think it is important to keep it as a relatively clearly defined discipline of trying to reduce inconsistencies where they really exist, and we certainly do have them.
Since the spontaneous discipline of the market upon the national administrations is gradually disappearing, it must be replaced by establishing a central administrative authority which will hand out orders.
I believe it to be a successful draft that looks to fund new requirements and is, at the same time, guided by budgetary discipline.
Of course there should be budgetary discipline and rigour, but what you have been doing over the last five years is not an example of rigour but rather of shoddiness.
Strengthening discipline and the proper functioning of the stock exchanges are one of the most important projects in the action plan for the investment markets.
We must tackle it with discipline and determination, and always in cooperation with the fishermen, whose opinions and cooperation we crave.
Clearly, it is not a currency of trade, nor is it a factor of budgetary discipline but is, on the contrary, one of laxity.
The first is discipline.
The euro is not an answer to the structural problems of individual economies, or to excessive debt or a lack of financial discipline.