Meaning of “discount” in the English Dictionary

"discount" in British English

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discountnoun [ C ]

uk /ˈdɪs.kaʊnt/ us /ˈdɪs.kaʊnt/

A2 a reduction in the usual price:

They usually give you a discount if you buy multiple copies.
They offer a ten percent discount on travel for students.

More examples

  • It was the offer of a large discount on the TV that was the real clincher.
  • There is a 25% discount on all electrical goods until the end of the week.
  • Students and pensioners are entitled to a discount.
  • The discount applies only to children under (the age of) ten.
  • People who work in the trade can buy their books at a discount.

discountverb

uk /dɪˈskaʊnt/ us /dɪˈskaʊnt/

(Definition of “discount” from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"discount" in American English

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discountnoun [ C ]

us /ˈdɪs·kɑʊnt/

a reduction in the usual price for something:

Students receive a 10 percent discount.
He gets a senior citizen discount at the theater.

discountverb [ T ]

us /dɪsˈkɑʊnt, ˈdɪs·kɑʊnt/

discount verb [ T ] (NOT CONSIDER)

to decide that something or someone is not worth consideration or attention:

He discounted fears about computer programming problems involving the year 2000 as exaggerated.

discount verb [ T ] (REDUCE PRICE)

to reduce the usual price for something:

The airline has discounted domestic fares.

(Definition of “discount” from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"discount" in Business English

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discountnoun

uk /ˈdɪskaʊnt/ us

[ C or U ] COMMERCE a reduction in the usual price of a product or service:

get/receive a discount You get a discount if you buy four ink cartridges.
give/offer a discount Car manufacturers are offering discounts of up to 15% on all new models.
huge/deep/big discount They purchased the stock at a huge discount.
The price without discount will be around $55.

[ C, usually singular ] FINANCE the difference between the reduced price that you originally paid for a security, and the amount you will be paid back when it is ready to be paid:

All these securities are sold at a discount to their par value.

discountverb

uk /dɪˈskaʊnt/ us /ˈdɪskaʊnt/

[ T ] COMMERCE to sell a product or service for less than the usual price:

Our entire inventory is discounted below retail prices.
discount sth by 55%/a quarter, etc. The initial charges will be 5.25%, discounted by 2% to 3.25 % until 31 January.

[ T, usually passive ] STOCK MARKET if shares are discounted, they go down in price, often following bad news:

Stocks were being discounted because of political concerns related to the upcoming election.

[ T ] FINANCE to buy a bill of exchange before its payment date at a price that is lower than its value, in order to make a profit when it is paid on its payment date:

If an exporter has good credit, the bank may purchase or discount his collection bills.

discountadjective [ before noun ]

uk /ˈdɪskaʊnt/ us

COMMERCE →  discounted :

FINANCE, STOCK MARKET →  discounted :

discount bills of exchange

(Definition of “discount” from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)