Meaning of “dispute” in the English Dictionary

"dispute" in British English

See all translations

disputenoun [ C or U ]

uk /dɪˈspjuːt/ /ˈdɪs.pjuːt/ us /dɪˈspjuːt/ /ˈdɪs.pjuːt/

C2 an argument or disagreement, especially an official one between, for example, workers and employers or two countries with a common border:

a border dispute
a pay/legal/trade dispute
They have been unable to settle/resolve the dispute over working conditions.
The unions are in dispute with management over pay.
beyond (all) dispute

C2 certainly:

He is beyond all dispute the finest actor in Hollywood today.
in dispute

being doubted:

I don't think her ability is in dispute - what I question is her attitude.
open to dispute

not certain:

He says it's the best musical equipment you can buy, but I think that's open to dispute.

More examples

  • All attempts at conciliation failed and the dispute continued.
  • An outside adviser has been brought in to arbitrate the dispute between the management and the union.
  • Management have demonstrated almost unbelievable incompetence in their handling of the dispute.
  • I'd like to help but I don't have the power to intervene in this dispute.
  • The chances of settling this dispute through talks seem increasingly slender.

disputeverb [ I or T ]

uk /dɪˈspjuːt/ us /dɪˈspjuːt/

C2 to disagree with something that someone says:

Few would dispute his status as the finest artist of the period.
The circumstances of her death have been hotly disputed.
[ + (that) ] I don't dispute (that) his movies are entertaining, but they don't have much depth.

More examples

  • How can you be a Christian and dispute the divinity of Jesus?
  • Several experts now dispute the usual attribution of the work to Leonardo.
  • Are you disputing the judge's decision, madam?
  • Many people would dispute that statement.
  • I don't dispute her ability, but what I question is her attitude.
disputation
noun [ C or U ] uk /ˌdɪs.pjuˈteɪ.ʃən/ us /ˌdɪs.pjuːˈteɪ.ʃən/ formal
disputatious
adjective uk /ˌdɪs.pjuˈteɪ.ʃəs/ us /ˌdɪs.pjuːˈteɪ.ʃəs/ old use

He's a disputatious young man (= he argues a lot).
disputed
adjective uk /dɪˈspjuː.tɪd/ us /dɪˈspjuː.t̬ɪd/

a disputed border/goal
disputed territory

(Definition of “dispute” from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"dispute" in American English

See all translations

disputenoun [ C/U ]

us /dɪˈspjut/

an argument or disagreement:

[ C ] Management and the union are trying to resolve the dispute over working conditions.
Her skill is not in dispute (= there is no disagreement about her skill), but she doesn’t produce enough work.
dispute
verb [ I/T ] us /dɪˈspjut/

[ + that clause ] I don’t dispute that his films are entertaining, but they don’t have much depth.

(Definition of “dispute” from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"dispute" in Business English

See all translations

disputenoun [ C or U ]

uk /ˈdɪspjuːt/ us

an argument or disagreement, especially an official one:

The judge urged the feuding partners to settle their legal dispute .
Staff have been in a long-running pay dispute with the company.
An official involved in the dispute said that the attorney has indicated he is likely to agree to the revised terms.
He was in dispute with his last company, which had terminated his contract.
Workers at the car plant are to stage a fresh strike in a dispute over pay.
dispute between/with sb/sth (and sb/sth) The dispute between Brazil and the United States over immigration checks continued.
a bitter/long-running dispute
in dispute

not yet agreed on or accepted by everyone:

Sensitive documents related to personnel that ought to be protected for privacy reasons are the only documents that are in dispute.
The facts in this matter are in dispute.

disputeverb [ T ]

uk /dɪˈspjuːt/ us

to disagree with or express doubts about something:

Health insurers dispute the doctors' statement that they don't pay enough to make up for the cost of the vaccine.
Many in the television industry dispute research findings suggesting negative long-term effects of television violence.

(Definition of “dispute” from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

Blogs about "dispute"