Meaning of “disrupt” in the English Dictionary

"disrupt" in British English

See all translations

disruptverb [ T ]

uk /dɪsˈrʌpt/ us /dɪsˈrʌpt/

B2 to prevent something, especially a system, process, or event, from continuing as usual or as expected:

Heavy snow disrupted travel into the city this morning.
The meeting was disrupted by a group of protesters who shouted and threw fruit at the speaker.

specialized business to change the traditional way that an industry operates, especially in a new and effective way:

Dell Inc. disrupted the traditional way of selling computers by switching to the internet.

More examples

disruption
noun [ C or U ] uk /dɪsˈrʌp.ʃən/ us /dɪsˈrʌp.ʃən/

More examples

C1

The accident is causing widespread disruption on the roads.
the disruption of the telecoms industry

(Definition of “disrupt” from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"disrupt" in American English

See all translations

disruptverb [ T ]

us /dɪsˈrʌpt/

to prevent something, esp. a system, process, or event, from continuing as usual or as expected:

A heavy fall of snow disrupted traffic during the rush hour.
disruption
noun [ C/U ] us /dɪsˈrʌp·ʃən/

[ C ] Strikes threaten more disruptions for the tourist industry.

(Definition of “disrupt” from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"disrupt" in Business English

See all translations

disruptverb [ T ]

uk /dɪsˈrʌpt/ us

to prevent something, especially a system, process, or event, from continuing as usual or as expected:

Meetings with her lawyers did not disrupt the schedule.
Commerce could be disrupted in a cyberterrorism attack.

(Definition of “disrupt” from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)