distress Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Meaning of “distress” in the English Dictionary

"distress" in British English

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distressnoun [U]

uk   us   /dɪˈstres/
C1 a ​feeling of ​extremeworry, ​sadness, or ​pain: She ​claimed that the way she had been ​treated at ​work had ​caused her ​extremeemotional and ​psychological distress. Many of the ​horses were ​showingsigns of distress at the end of the ​race.C2 a ​situation in which you are ​suffering or are in ​greatdanger and ​therefore in ​urgent need of ​help: Six ​people were ​rescued by ​helicopter from a ​fishingboat in distress off the ​coast. a distress signal
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distressverb [T]

uk   us   /dɪˈstres/
to make someone ​feel very ​upset or ​worried: I ​hope I haven't distressed you with all these ​personalquestions.
(Definition of distress from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"distress" in American English

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distressnoun [U]

 us   /dɪˈstres/
greatmental or ​physicalsuffering, such as ​extremeanxiety, ​sadness, or ​pain, or the ​state of being in ​danger or ​urgent need: emotional/​financial distress Four men were ​rescued from a ​fishingboat in distress off the ​coast.
distress
verb [T]  us   /dɪˈstres/
Rice ​appeared distressed about the ​argument and could not ​talk about it.
distressing
adjective  us   /dɪˈstres·ɪŋ/
[+ that clause] It is distressing that so little ​progress has been made after all this ​time.
(Definition of distress from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"distress" in Business English

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distressnoun

uk   us   /dɪˈstres/
[C or U] LAW the ​legalaction of taking and ​selling another person’s ​property in ​order to get ​money for a ​payment or ​debt that they ​owe: make a distress A distress should be made for the whole ​rent in ​arrears; but if ​goods cannot be ​found at the ​time, the ​injuredparty may make a second distress.
[U] ECONOMICS, FINANCE financialfailure, for ​example, not having enough ​money to ​pay back a ​debt or the ​costs of ​operating a ​business: Rising dependence on ​creditcards could be a ​sign of distress as some ​consumersborrow just to ​meetroutineexpenses. economic/​financial distress
(Definition of distress from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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