dive Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary
Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

Meaning of “dive” in the English Dictionary

"dive" in British English

See all translations

diveverb

uk   us   /daɪv/ (past tense dived or US also dove, past participle dived)

dive verb (IN WATER)

B1 to ​jump into ​water, ​especially with ​yourhead and ​arms going in first, or to ​move down under the ​water: Look at those ​children diving foroysters over there! They ​ran to the ​pool, dived in, and ​swam to the other ​side. Mark dove off the ​bridge into the ​river. The ​submarine dived just in ​time to ​avoid the ​enemyattack.
See also
B1 [I] to ​swimunderwater, usually with ​breathingequipment
More examples

dive verb (BECOME LESS)

[I] to ​fall in ​valuesuddenly and by a ​largeamount: The company's ​shares dived by 90p to 65p on the ​stockmarketyesterday.

dive verb (MOVE QUICKLY)

[I] to go down very ​quickly: The ​plane dived towards the ​ground and ​exploded in a ​ball of ​flame. The ​goalkeeper dived for the ​ball (= ​tried to ​catch the ​ball by ​jumping towards it and ​falling on the ​ground). [I usually + adv/prep] to ​movequickly, often in ​order to ​avoid something: They dived forcover when they ​heard the ​shootingstart. [I] in ​football, to ​fall down ​deliberately without another ​playercausing you to ​fall, in ​order to ​try to ​win a penalty or a freekickunfairly: Referees should be ​bookingplayers when they dive.
Phrasal verbs

divenoun

uk   us   /daɪv/

dive noun (INTO WATER)

B2 [C] a ​jump into ​water with ​yourhead going in first: the ​best dive of the ​competition

dive noun (LOSS)

[S] a ​suddenloss in ​value: The company's ​profits took a dive last ​month.

dive noun (QUICK MOVEMENT)

[C] a ​movement down onto the ​ground: The ​goalkeeper made a ​valiant dive for the ​ball, but he couldn't ​quite get his ​hands on it. The ​plane went into a dive. [C] in ​football, the ​action of ​falling down ​deliberately without another ​playercausing you to do so, in ​order to ​try to ​win a penalty or freekickunfairly [C] a ​suddenquickmovement: He made a dive for the ​door.

dive noun (PLACE)

[C] informal a ​restaurant, ​hotel, ​bar, or ​place for ​entertainment or ​socialactivities that is ​unpleasant because of the ​condition of the ​building or the ​type of ​people that go there: The ​place is a ​real dive, but the ​drinks are ​cheap and the food's ​great.
(Definition of dive from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"dive" in American English

See all translations

diveverb

 us   /dɑɪv/ (past tense dived or dove  /doʊv/ , past participle dived)

dive verb (MOVE DOWN)

[I] to ​jumphead first into ​water, esp. with ​yourarmsheldstraight above ​yourhead, or to move down ​quickly through ​water or the ​air: Mark dove off the ​cliff into the ​ocean. Dolphins can dive to ​greatdepths. [+ to infinitive] The ​plane dived to ​avoidenemyaircraftfire.

dive verb (MOVE QUICKLY)

[I always + adv/prep] to ​jump or move ​quickly into or at something: When the ​football came ​loose, he dove at the ​ball and ​grabbed it. They dived for ​cover when it ​suddenlybegan to ​rain.

divenoun

 us   /dɑɪv/

dive noun (PLACE)

[C] infml a ​cheap, ​unattractivebar or ​place for ​entertainment

dive noun (FALL)

[C] a ​sudden, ​largefall in ​amount or ​value: The firm’s ​profits took a dive last ​quarter.

dive noun (QUICK MOVE)

[U] a ​quick move or ​jump into or at something: White’s 1-yard dive with ​secondsleftwon the ​footballgame.
(Definition of dive from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"dive" in Business English

See all translations

diveverb [I]

uk   us   /daɪv/ (dived, US also dove, dived)
to suddenly become less ​valuable: Shares ​prices dived 3.5% today to a three-month ​closinglow. Pre-tax ​profits dove almost 60% to $105m against $245m in the same ​period last ​year.

divenoun [C, usually singular]

uk   us   /daɪv/
a sudden ​loss of ​value or ​success: The ​bondmarkettraded nervously as many ​shares on Wall Street took a dive and ​oilpricessoared.
(Definition of dive from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of dive?
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website
Word of the Day
boarding school

a school where students live and study

Word of the Day

Introducing a new author and a new weekly blog post!
Introducing a new author and a new weekly blog post!
by ,
August 27, 2015
The English language is constantly changing. You know that. But did you know that at Cambridge Dictionaries Online we keep track of the changes? We continually add new words and new meanings to our online dictionary for learners of English. Some of them are new to English entirely (neologisms), and some are new to our

Read More 

hyperpalatable adjective
hyperpalatable adjective
August 24, 2015
describes food with heightened levels of sugar and salt, intended to be extremely appealing In Brazil, where the prevalence of overweight and obese adults has doubled since 1980, crisps, biscuits, energy bars and sugary drinks formulated to be ‘hyper-palatable’ are much more widely eaten than previously.

Read More