dive Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo

Meaning of “dive” in the English Dictionary

"dive" in British English

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diveverb

uk   us   /daɪv/ (past tense dived or US also dove, past participle dived)
  • dive verb (IN WATER)

B1 to ​jump into ​water, ​especially with ​yourhead and ​arms going in first, or to ​move down under the ​water: Look at those ​children diving foroysters over there! They ​ran to the ​pool, dived in, and ​swam to the other ​side. Mark dove off the ​bridge into the ​river. The ​submarine dived just in ​time to ​avoid the ​enemyattack.
See also
B1 [I] to ​swimunderwater, usually with ​breathingequipment

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

  • dive verb (MOVE QUICKLY)

[I] to go down very ​quickly: The ​plane dived towards the ​ground and ​exploded in a ​ball of ​flame. The ​goalkeeper dived for the ​ball (= ​tried to ​catch the ​ball by ​jumping towards it and ​falling on the ​ground). [I usually + adv/prep] to ​movequickly, often in ​order to ​avoid something: They dived forcover when they ​heard the ​shootingstart. [I] in ​football, to ​fall down ​deliberately without another ​playercausing you to ​fall, in ​order to ​try to ​win a penalty or a freekickunfairly: Referees should be ​bookingplayers when they dive.
Phrasal verbs

divenoun

uk   us   /daɪv/
  • dive noun (QUICK MOVEMENT)

[C] a ​movement down onto the ​ground: The ​goalkeeper made a ​valiant dive for the ​ball, but he couldn't ​quite get his ​hands on it. The ​plane went into a dive. [C] in ​football, the ​action of ​falling down ​deliberately without another ​playercausing you to do so, in ​order to ​try to ​win a penalty or freekickunfairly [C] a ​suddenquickmovement: He made a dive for the ​door.
  • dive noun (PLACE)

[C] informal a ​restaurant, ​hotel, ​bar, or ​place for ​entertainment or ​socialactivities that is ​unpleasant because of the ​condition of the ​building or the ​type of ​people that go there: The ​place is a ​real dive, but the ​drinks are ​cheap and the food's ​great.
(Definition of dive from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"dive" in American English

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diveverb

 us   /dɑɪv/ (past tense dived or dove  /doʊv/ , past participle dived)
  • dive verb (MOVE DOWN)

[I] to ​jumphead first into ​water, esp. with ​yourarmsheldstraight above ​yourhead, or to move down ​quickly through ​water or the ​air: Mark dove off the ​cliff into the ​ocean. Dolphins can dive to ​greatdepths. [+ to infinitive] The ​plane dived to ​avoidenemyaircraftfire.
  • dive verb (MOVE QUICKLY)

[I always + adv/prep] to ​jump or move ​quickly into or at something: When the ​football came ​loose, he dove at the ​ball and ​grabbed it. They dived for ​cover when it ​suddenlybegan to ​rain.

divenoun

 us   /dɑɪv/
  • dive noun (PLACE)

[C] infml a ​cheap, ​unattractivebar or ​place for ​entertainment
  • dive noun (FALL)

[C] a ​sudden, ​largefall in ​amount or ​value: The firm’s ​profits took a dive last ​quarter.
  • dive noun (QUICK MOVE)

[U] a ​quick move or ​jump into or at something: White’s 1-yard dive with ​secondsleftwon the ​footballgame.
(Definition of dive from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"dive" in Business English

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diveverb [I]

uk   us   /daɪv/ (dived, US also dove, dived)
to suddenly become less ​valuable: Shares ​prices dived 3.5% today to a three-month ​closinglow. Pre-tax ​profits dove almost 60% to $105m against $245m in the same ​period last ​year.

divenoun [C, usually singular]

uk   us   /daɪv/
a sudden ​loss of ​value or ​success: The ​bondmarkettraded nervously as many ​shares on Wall Street took a dive and ​oilpricessoared.
(Definition of dive from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“dive” in Business English

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