divert Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo

Meaning of “divert” in the English Dictionary

"divert" in British English

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divertverb [T]

uk   /daɪˈvɜːt/  us   /dɪˈvɝːt/
  • divert verb [T] (CHANGE DIRECTION)

C2 to ​cause something or someone to ​changedirection: Traffic will be diverted through the ​sidestreets while the ​mainroad is ​resurfaced. Our ​flight had to be diverted to Newark because of the ​storm. to use something for a different ​purpose: Should more funds/​money/​resources be diverted fromroads intorailways?
  • divert verb [T] (TAKE ATTENTION AWAY)

C1 to take someone's ​attention away from something: The ​war has diverted attention (away) from the country's ​economicproblems. formal to ​entertain someone: It's a ​greatgame for diverting ​restlesskids on ​longcarrides .
(Definition of divert from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"divert" in American English

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divertverb [T]

 us   /dɪˈvɜrt, dɑɪ-/
  • divert verb [T] (CHANGE DIRECTION)

to ​cause something or someone to ​turn in a different ​direction: Our ​flight was diverted from San Francisco to Oakland because of the ​fog. To divert something or someone is also to ​cause the thing or ​person to be used for a different ​purpose: The ​administration had to divert ​funds from the ​defensebudget to ​pay for the ​emergencyreliefeffort.
  • divert verb [T] (TAKE ATTENTION AWAY)

to take ​attention away from something: Military ​action now could divert ​attention from ​imminentvotes in ​Congress on health-care ​legislation. fml To divert can also ​mean to ​amuse: The ​dogkept the ​children diverted for a while.
(Definition of divert from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"divert" in Business English

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divertverb [T]

uk   us   /daɪˈvɜːt/
to use something such as ​money for a ​purpose that is different from the ​main one or the one that was originally ​planned: divert sth to sb/sth Mutuals tend to ​pay out more than ​quotedinsurers because they do not have to divert a chunk of their ​profits to ​shareholders.divert sth from sth to/into sth The ​company is to divert ​resources from its traditional ​retail interiors ​operation into its furniture ​business.
to take a person's or people's ​attention away from something so that they ​think about something else: The ​news of his ​appointment diverted ​attention from a 20% ​fall in ​pretaxprofit.
COMMERCE to ​sellgoods or ​services in a different ​place from the ​place where it was ​planned that they should be ​sold: If you see a hair ​careproduct that you ​think may be an ​illegally diverted ​product, ​call the ​brandmanufacturerright away.
TRANSPORT to ​change the way that ​goods are ​sent or the ​place that they are ​sent to: Many of the ​shipments have been diverted from ​air to ​rail. Shipping ​lines were considering diverting their ​vessels to other ​major Japanese ​ports to ​unloadcargo.
COMMUNICATIONS to ​arrange for ​phonecalls to go directly to another ​number: A ​phone can be set to divert a ​call when the ​line is ​busy.
Phrasal verbs
(Definition of divert from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“divert” in Business English

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