divide Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary
Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

Meaning of “divide” in the English Dictionary

"divide" in British English

See all translations

divideverb

uk   us   /dɪˈvaɪd/

divide verb (SEPARATE)

B1 [I or T] to (​cause to) ​separate into ​parts or ​groups: At the end of the ​lecture, I'd like all the ​students to divide intosmalldiscussiongroups. After the Second World War Germany was divided into two ​separatecountries.C1 [T] to ​share: I ​think we should divide (up) the ​costsequally among/between us.B2 [T] If something divides two ​areas, it ​marks the ​edge or ​limit of them: There's a ​narrowalley that divides ​ourhouse from the one next ​door. This ​pathmarks the dividing line between my ​land and my neighbour's. [T] to use different ​amounts of something for different ​purposes or ​activities: She divides her ​time between her ​apartment in New York and her ​house in the Berkshires. [I] UK If Members of Parliament divide, they ​vote by ​separating into two ​groups, one ​group who ​want the ​law that is being ​voted on to be ​accepted and one ​group who are against it: After a ​lengthydebate, MPs/the House of Commons divided.
More examples

divide verb (DISAGREE)

B2 [T often passive] to ​cause a ​group of ​people to ​disagree about something: The ​party is divided on/over the ​issue of ​capitalpunishment.divide and rule a way of ​keeping yourself in a ​position of ​power by ​causingdisagreements among other ​people so that they are ​unable to ​oppose you

divide verb (CALCULATE)

divide sth by sth to ​calculate the ​number of ​times that one ​numberfits (​exactly) into another: 10 divided by 5 is/​equals 2. divide (sth) into sth C1 If a ​number divides into another ​number, it ​fits (​exactly) into it when ​multiplied a ​particularnumber of ​times: What do you get if you divide 6 into 18? 2 divides into 10 five ​times.

dividenoun [C]

uk   us   /dɪˈvaɪd/
C1 a ​difference or ​separation: The divide between the ​rich and the ​poor in this ​country is ​continuing to ​grow.
(Definition of divide from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"divide" in American English

See all translations

divideverb [I/T]

 us   /dɪˈvɑɪd/

divide verb [I/T] (SEPARATE)

to ​separate into ​parts or ​groups, or to ​cause something to ​separate in such a way: [T] Divide the ​cake into six ​equalparts. [I] The ​votes divided ​equally for and against the ​proposal. If something divides two ​areas, it ​marks the ​edge or ​limit of both of them: [T] A ​narrowdriveway divides ​ourhouse from the one next ​door. To divide a ​group of ​people is to ​cause them to ​disagree: [T] The ​issue of ​taxreformcontinues to divide the ​country.

divide verb [I/T] (CALCULATE)

mathematics to ​calculate the ​number of ​times one ​number is ​contained in another: [T] 10 divided by 5 is/​equals 2. [T] What do you get if you divide 6 into 18?

dividenoun [C]

 /dɪˈvɑɪd/

divide noun [C] (SEPARATION)

a ​separation: The ​riverforms a divide between ​mountains and ​coastalplains. It’s on ​taxes that the divide between the two ​candidates is ​widest.
(Definition of divide from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"divide" in Business English

See all translations

divideverb

uk   us   /dɪˈvaɪd/
[T] to ​calculate the ​number of ​times one ​numberfits into another: Convert the ​euroamount into ​sterling by dividing the ​euroamount by the ​exchangerate.
[I or T] to ​separate, or make something ​separate, into different ​parts or ​groups: He and his brother decided to divide the ​company into two ​parts.
(Definition of divide from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of divide?
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website
Word of the Day

harvest

to pick and collect crops, or to collect plants, animals, or fish to eat

Word of the Day

In London but at the station: prepositions for talking about travel
In London but at the station: prepositions for talking about travel
by Liz Walter,
September 02, 2015
Several readers have asked for information on prepositions, so I will start with a blog post that looks at an area where they are really important: travel. The first thing to remember is that we use to (and not ‘in’) after the verb go: We are going to London. I went to

Read More 

parklet noun
parklet noun
August 31, 2015
a public outdoor space that may be associated with a local business but where anyone can sit Pop-up cafes in NY are what’s actually called parklets in many other places around the country.

Read More