double-dip Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo

Meaning of “double-dip” in the English Dictionary

"double-dip" in British English

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double-dipverb [I]

uk   us   /ˌdʌb.l̩ˈdɪp/ US
to ​receivemoney from two ​places at the same ​time, sometimes in a way that is not ​legal

double-dipadjective [before noun]

uk   us   /ˌdʌb.l̩ˈdɪp/
used for ​describing a ​period of ​time during which ​economicactivity gets ​weaker, ​increases a little, and then gets ​weaker again: a double-dip recession
(Definition of double-dip from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"double dip" in Business English

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double dipnoun [C]

uk   us  
ECONOMICS →  double-dip recession
FINANCE a ​situation in which, if a ​company is ​sold, a ​shareholder has the ​right to receive both a particular ​price for their ​shares and ​money from the ​sale of the company’s assets

double-dipverb [I]

uk   us   /ˌdʌbl̩ˈdɪp/ US FINANCE
to receive ​income from two ​places, for ​example from a ​governmentpension while ​employed by the ​government, or from two different ​governmentpensions: A ​loophole in ​federallawallows teachers to "​doubledip" in both a ​stateretirementsystem and the Social Security ​system.
double-dipping
noun [U]
The ​legislation would not outlaw "​doubledipping" - ​drawing a ​statesalary for a ​full-timejob and also being ​paid as a ​lawmaker.
double-dipper
noun [C]
The ​law will prevent ​double dippers, who ​draw two ​paychecks, from ​serving on the Joint Finance Committee, which writes the ​annualbudgetbill.
(Definition of double dip from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
Translations of “double-dip”
in Chinese (Simplified) 同时赚两份钱(常指从事非法活动)…
in Chinese (Traditional) 同時賺兩份錢(常指從事非法活動)…
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“double-dip” in British English

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