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Meaning of “dry” in the English Dictionary

"dry" in British English

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dryadjective

uk   /draɪ/ us   /draɪ/ drier, driest
  • dry adjective (NOT WET)

A2 used to describe something that has no water or other liquid in, on, or around it: I hung his wet trousers on the radiator, but they're not dry yet. These plants grow well in dry soil/a dry climate. This cake's a bit dry - I think I left it in the oven for too long.
run dry
If a river or other area of water runs dry, the water gradually disappears from it: By this time all the wells had run dry.
C1 Dry hair or skin does not have enough of the natural oils that make it soft and smooth: a shampoo for dry hair
UK Dry bread is plain, without butter, jam, etc.: All I was offered was a piece of dry bread and an apple!

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  • dry adjective (NO ALCOHOL)

without alcoholic drinks: a dry wedding a dry bar a dry state (= a place that does not allow alcohol)
  • dry adjective (NOT SWEET)

C1 If wine or other alcoholic drinks are dry, they do not taste sweet: dry cider/martini/sherry/wine On the whole, I like dry wine better than sweet.
  • dry adjective (HUMOUR)

approving Dry humour is very funny in a way that is clever and not obvious: a dry sense of humour a dry wit
dryness
noun [U] uk   /ˈdraɪ.nəs/ us   /ˈdraɪ.nəs/
The wine has just enough dryness to balance its fruitiness. The meat was juicy with no hint of dryness.

drynoun

uk   /draɪ/ us   /draɪ/
the dry UK
a place where the conditions are not wet, especially when compared to somewhere where the conditions are wet: You're soaked - come into the dry.

dryverb [I or T]

uk   /draɪ/ us   /draɪ/
A2 to become dry, or to make something become dry: Will this paint dry by tomorrow? Hang the clothes up to dry. The fruit is dried in the sun.
dry the dishes UK also dry up (the dishes), UK do the drying (up)
to dry plates, knives, forks, etc. after they have been washed

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(Definition of dry from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"dry" in American English

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dryadjective

us   /drɑɪ/
  • dry adjective (NOT WET)

[-er/-est only] without water or liquid in, on, or around something: Are the clothes dry yet?
[-er/-est only] If hair or skin is dry, it lacks natural oils: Do you have a shampoo for dry hair?
[-er/-est only] If the weather is dry, there is very little water in the air and no chance of rain.
  • dry adjective (NO ALCOHOL)

  • dry adjective (NOT INTERESTING)

[-er/-est only] not interesting or exciting: The book is packed with information but it is a little dry.
  • dry adjective (AMUSING)

[-er/-est only] amusing in a way that is not obvious: a dry wit

dryverb [I/T]

us   /drɑɪ/ present tense dries, present participle drying, past tense and past participle dried
  • dry verb [I/T] (REMOVE WATER)

to become dry, or to remove water from something : [I] I can’t go out until my hair dries. [T] The woman dried her hands on a towel and returned to the table. [I] If you don’t keep food covered, it dries out.
(Definition of dry from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of dry?
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