Meaning of “duck” in the English Dictionary

"duck" in British English

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ducknoun

uk /dʌk/ us /dʌk/

duck noun (BIRD)

A2 [ C ] a bird that lives by water and has webbed feet (= feet with skin between the toes), a short neck, and a large beak

[ U ] the meat of this bird

Examples

duck noun (PERSON)

[ C ] UK old-fashioned informal also ducks a friendly way of talking to someone you like:

[ as form of address ] Come and sit beside me, duck.

duckverb

uk /dʌk/ us /dʌk/

[ I or T ] to move your head or the top part of your body quickly down, especially to avoid being hit:

I saw the ball hurtling towards me and ducked (down).
Duck your head or you'll bang it on the doorframe.

[ T ] to push someone underwater for a short time:

The boys were splashing around and ducking each other in the pool.

[ I + adv/prep ] to move quickly to a place, especially in order not to be seen:

When he saw them coming, he ducked into a doorway.

Phrasal verb(s)

(Definition of “duck” from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"duck" in American English

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ducknoun [ C/U ]

us /dʌk/

duck noun [ C/U ] (BIRD)

a bird that lives by water and has short legs with webbed feet (= feet with toes joined by skin), or the meat of this bird

duckverb [ I/T ]

us /dʌk/

duck verb [ I/T ] (MOVE)

to move your head or the top part of your body quickly down, esp. to avoid being hit:

[ T ] Duck your head or you’ll bang it on the door frame.
[ I ] She ducked below the surface of the rippling water.

To duck is also to move quickly to a place, esp. in order not to be seen:

[ I ] When he saw them coming, he ducked into a store.

To duck a subject or question is to avoid it:

[ T ] He accused the president of ducking the issue of campaign finance reform.

(Definition of “duck” from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)