due Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo

Meaning of “due” in the English Dictionary

"due" in British English

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dueadjective

uk   /djuː/  us   /duː/
  • due adjective (EXPECTED)

B1 expected to ​happen, ​arrive, etc. at a ​particulartime: What ​time is the next ​bus due? The next ​meeting is due to be ​held in three ​months' ​time. Their first ​baby is due in ​January.in due course B2 formal at a ​suitabletime in the ​future: You will ​receivenotification of the ​results in due ​course.

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  • due adjective (RESULTING)

due to

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B1 because of: A lot of her ​unhappiness is due to ​boredom. The ​bus was ​delayed due to ​heavysnow.
  • due adjective (OWED)

C2 owed as a ​debt or as a ​right: The ​rent is due (= should be ​paid) at the end of the ​month. £50 is due to me (US due me) from the ​people I ​worked for last ​month. Our ​thanks are due to everyone.UK law He was ​found to have been ​driving without due (= the ​necessary) care and ​attention.be due for sth C1 If you are due for something, you ​expect to ​receive it, because you ​deserve it: I'm due for a ​promotionsoon.

duenoun

uk   /djuː/  us   /duː/
give sb their due said when you are ​praising someone for something good they have done, ​although you ​dislike other things about them: He ​failed again, but to give him his due, he did ​try hard.dues [plural] the ​officialpayments that you make to an ​organization you ​belong to: Members of the ​societypay $1,000 in ​annual dues.

dueadverb

uk   /djuː/  us   /duː/
(Definition of due from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"due" in American English

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dueadjective

 us   /du/
  • due adjective (OWED)

[not gradable] owed as a ​debt or as a ​right: I’m due a ​refund for the ​sweater I ​returned. Our ​thanks are due to everyone who gave so ​generously. The ​rent is now due (= should be ​paid).
  • due adjective (EXPECTED)

[not gradable] expected (to ​happen, ​arrive, etc.) at a ​particulartime: What ​time is the next ​train due? [+ to infinitive] The ​meeting is now due to take ​place next ​week.
  • due adjective (RESULTING)

due to Due to can ​mean because of: Due to ​computerproblems, the ​checks will be late. The ​flight was ​canceled due to ​badweather.
  • due adjective (USUAL/CORRECT)

[not gradable] according to the ​usualcustom or the ​correctprocess: Phillips took due ​note of the ​keystatistics. In due ​course the ​businessbecame a ​realmoneymaker.

dueadverb [not gradable]

 us   /du/
(of ​north, ​south, ​east, or ​west) ​exactly, ​straight: They ​headed due ​north.
(Definition of due from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"due" in Business English

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dueadjective

uk   us   /djuː/
FINANCE, ACCOUNTING an ​amount that is due on a particular ​date has to be ​paid on that ​date: become/come/fall due A £110m ​interestpayment to ​bondholdersfalls due on March 25.due on/by sth More than $2.15 ​billion of its ​outstandingloans are due by the end of this ​year. The ​loancarries an ​interestrate of 7.625% ​per annum and is due and ​payable on January 31.
if you are due something, it is ​owed to you as a ​right: After 3 ​yearsemployment, I'll be due 3 weeks ​vacation.
if someone is due to do something, they are expected to do it or going to do it: He had been due to become ​technicaldirector, but the ​company was taken over.
expected to ​happen, arrive, etc. at a particular ​time: due on/by sth Applications are due by noon next Wednesday.be due to do sth The ​tribunal is due to ​meet this week.
(Definition of due from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“due” in Business English

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