Meaning of “ease” in the English Dictionary

"ease" in British English

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easeverb

uk /iːz/ us /iːz/

ease verb (MAKE LESS)

[ I or T ] to make or become less severe, difficult, unpleasant, painful, etc.:

To ease the problem of overcrowding, new prisons will be built.
These pills should ease the pain.
After the arrival of the United Nations soldiers, tension in the area began to ease.

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Idiom(s)

Phrasal verb(s)

easenoun [ U ]

uk /iːz/ us /iːz/

B2 the state of experiencing no difficulty, effort, pain, etc.:

She won the 400 metre race with ease.
The doors are extra-wide for ease of access (= so that people can get in without difficulty).
at (your) ease

B2 relaxed:

He felt completely at ease.
She soon put/set me at ease (= made me relaxed) .
at ease also standing at ease

If someone, especially a soldier, is at ease, they are standing with their feet apart and their hands behind their back.

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(Definition of “ease” from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"ease" in American English

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easeverb [ I/T ]

us /iz/

ease verb [ I/T ] (LESSEN)

to make or become less severe, difficult, unpleasant, or painful:

[ T ] These pills should ease the pain.

ease verb [ I/T ] (MOVE)

to move something slowly and carefully in a particular direction or into a particular position:

[ I ] I eased through the crowd to the stage.

Phrasal verb(s)

easenoun [ U ]

us /iz/

ease noun [ U ] (EASY EFFORT)

freedom from difficulty, effort, or pain:

She won the match with ease (= without difficulty).
He felt completely at ease (= relaxed and comfortable) with them.
at ease

Soldiers who are at ease stand in a slightly relaxed position with their feet apart and their hands behind their back.

(Definition of “ease” from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"ease" in Business English

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easeverb

uk /iːz/ us

[ I or T ] to make something less severe, difficult, etc. or to become less severe, difficult, etc.:

ease the burden/pressure/problem He made proposals to ease the tax burden on lower earners.
The rise in interest rates may prompt the government to ease fiscal policy again.
the tension/pressure/crisis eases

[ I ] FINANCE to become lower in value:

a rate/price eases Interbank interest rates in the domestic money market eased in the week to Nov. 15.
the dollar/market eases

[ I or T ] to move gradually to a different level, or to make something do this:

ease back/down/upwards Freight rates eased upwards.

easenoun [ U ]

uk /iːz/ us

the fact that something does not involve difficulty or effort:

We rated the products for ease of use, quality, and price.
Actuarial analysts can figure pension fund liabilities with ease.

(Definition of “ease” from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)