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Meaning of “edit” in the English Dictionary

"edit" in British English

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editverb [T]

uk   /ˈed.ɪt/ us   /ˈed.ɪt/
B2 to make changes to a text or film, deciding what will be removed and what will be kept in, in order to prepare it for being printed or shown: Janet edited books for a variety of publishers. The movie's 129 minutes were edited down from 150 hours of footage.
to be in charge of the reports in a newspaper or magazine, etc.: He edits a national newspaper.

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editing
noun [U] uk   /ˈed.ɪ.tɪŋ/ us   /ˈed.ɪ.t̬ɪŋ/
Filming the documentary took two months, but editing took another four.
Phrasal verbs

editnoun [C, usually singular]

/ˈed.ɪt/
an act of making changes to a text or film, deciding what will be removed and what will be kept in, in order to prepare it for being printed or shown: The article needed a thorough edit before it could be published.
a range of clothes or other goods that has been chosen for a particular purpose, or to be worn or used at a particular time: Check out the delightful dresses in our new summer edit.
(Definition of edit from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"edit" in American English

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editverb [T]

us   /ˈed·ət/
to prepare text or film for printing or viewing by correcting mistakes, deciding what will be removed, etc., or to be in charge of what is reported in a newspaper, magazine, etc.: He edits the local newspaper.
If you edit something out, you remove it before it is broadcast or printed: [M] Some of the best jazz performances were recorded in the 1930s, before musicians had the luxury of editing out mistakes.
(Definition of edit from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"edit" in Business English

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editverb [T]

uk   /ˈedɪt/ us  
IT, COMMUNICATIONS to make changes to a text, film, etc., correcting mistakes or removing some parts, especially in order to prepare it for being printed or shown: We may edit your letters for length or clarity. When you edit video on a PC, the software allows you to trim scenes by a fraction of a second if you wish. A wiki is a web page that can be edited by any reader.
to be in charge of a newspaper, magazine, etc. and decide what will be published in it: She was the first woman to edit a national newspaper.
editing
noun [U] /ˈedɪtɪŋ/ /-ṱɪŋ/
You can set combinations of restrictions and passwords on documents to control opening, viewing, and editing.
Phrasal verbs
(Definition of edit from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of edit?
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“edit” in British English

“edit” in Business English

Avoiding common errors with the word enough.
Avoiding common errors with the word enough.
by ,
May 25, 2016
by Liz Walter Enough is a very common word, but it is easy to make mistakes with it. You need to be careful about its position in a sentence, and the prepositions or verb patterns that come after it. I’ll start with the position of enough in the sentence. When we use it with a noun,

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