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Meaning of “endorse” in the English Dictionary

"endorse" in British English

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endorseverb [T]

uk   /ɪnˈdɔːs/ us   /ɪnˈdɔːrs/
  • endorse verb [T] (SUPPORT)

C2 to make a public statement of your approval or support for something or someone: The Council is expected to endorse the committee's recommendations.formal I fully endorse (= agree with) everything the Chairperson has said.
to appear in an advertisement, saying that you use and like a particular product: They paid $2 million to the world champion to endorse their new aftershave.

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  • endorse verb [T] (PUNISH)

UK to officially record on a driving licence that the driver has been found guilty of driving in an illegal way
(Definition of endorse from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"endorse" in American English

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endorseverb [T]

us   /ɪnˈdɔrs/
  • endorse verb [T] (SUPPORT)

to make a public statement of your approval or support for something or someone: We’re not endorsing tax increases. My wife has publicly endorsed Lunny for city council.
If someone endorses a product, a statement saying the person likes or uses the product is used in advertising the product.
  • endorse verb [T] (SIGN)

to write your name on a check: He endorsed the check and deposited it in his account.
(Definition of endorse from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"endorse" in Business English

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endorseverb [T]

US also indorse uk   /ɪnˈdɔːs/ us  
to state publicly that you approve of or support someone or something: endorse a decision/plan/proposal Federal safety regulators endorsed the company's decision to stop selling the product.be endorsed by sb/sth She has been endorsed by unions that represent nearly 4 million workers nationwide.endorse sb for sth The Commissioner praised the president and endorsed him for re-election. enthusiastically/strongly/vigorously endorse
MARKETING to appear in an advertisement saying that you use and like a product: The league prohibits players from endorsing products related to alcohol, tobacco, casinos, or gambling.be endorsed by sb The new contemporary womenswear range - endorsed by well-known actress Tania Mitchell - was launched this autumn.
BANKING to sign the back of a cheque, bill of exchange, etc. that has your name on it in order to give permission for it to be paid to someone else: To endorse a cheque the original payee just has to sign the back of the cheque and state the name of the person concerned.
INSURANCE to include a condition in an insurance agreement: The insurer can be asked to endorse the insurance certificate to confirm that driving in the performance of the employer's business is covered by the policy.
(Definition of endorse from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“endorse” in American English

“endorse” in Business English

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Avoiding common errors with the word enough.
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